2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166132
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Avoiding Battering Men: Women's Strategies of Testing Men's Potential forViolence
Author(s):
Langford, David
Author Details:
David Langford, DNS/DNSc/DSN, College of Nursing and Health Professions, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, email: drlangfo@uncc.edu
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: It is often suggested that battered women go from one battering relationship to another. Yet there is little empirical data to support this assertion. Data from the study to be reported in this presentation suggests that women seek to avoid entering into relationships with violent men. The purpose of the current study was to further analyze the concept of "testing" that emerged from a qualitative study of women's perceptions and responses to danger in their relationships with battering men. The "test" or process of "testing" has not been described in the literature. METHOD: Thirty women were interviewed in-depth about their experiences living with violent partners. Interviews were conducted in small groups and individually. Women were recruited from the community using advertisements in free neighborhood newspapers and were eligible if they were over 18 years of age, spoke English, and had been in a battering relationship with a man in the previous five years. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. FINDINGS: Men's histories of violence were generally not available to women contemplating entering new relationship with men. Women's friends, who often provided the initial introductions, did not share their knowledge of a man's previous use of violence when introducing women to male friends. Because women were unable to differentiate violent men, they described using a process of "testing" male acquaintances and future boyfriends to assess their potential for violence. "Testing" was an attempt to predict potentially violent men prior to developing relationships with them. The process of "testing" was accomplished by comparing identified behaviors of men to consciously constructed criteria based on their past experiences of abuse. "Testing" consisted of listening and observing how men talked about and treated other women and children in their lives, especially their mothers and sisters. Some women would intentionally incite men's reactions by discussing religion or politics, disagreeing with them, or starting an argument and then watching for physical and behavioral changes, such as "turning red" or raising their voices, that signified the man's potential for violence. IMPLICATIONS: The significance of this research is in identifying empowering strategies used by women to protect themselves and prevent entering another violent relationship. It is especially important in dispelling stereotypes and myths of battled women as passive and helpless victims. Identifying potential indicators of battering men has applications for prevention such as educating young women about warning signs and targeting prevention programs to "at-risk" men.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAvoiding Battering Men: Women's Strategies of Testing Men's Potential forViolenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLangford, Daviden_US
dc.author.detailsDavid Langford, DNS/DNSc/DSN, College of Nursing and Health Professions, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, email: drlangfo@uncc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166132-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: It is often suggested that battered women go from one battering relationship to another. Yet there is little empirical data to support this assertion. Data from the study to be reported in this presentation suggests that women seek to avoid entering into relationships with violent men. The purpose of the current study was to further analyze the concept of "testing" that emerged from a qualitative study of women's perceptions and responses to danger in their relationships with battering men. The "test" or process of "testing" has not been described in the literature. METHOD: Thirty women were interviewed in-depth about their experiences living with violent partners. Interviews were conducted in small groups and individually. Women were recruited from the community using advertisements in free neighborhood newspapers and were eligible if they were over 18 years of age, spoke English, and had been in a battering relationship with a man in the previous five years. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. FINDINGS: Men's histories of violence were generally not available to women contemplating entering new relationship with men. Women's friends, who often provided the initial introductions, did not share their knowledge of a man's previous use of violence when introducing women to male friends. Because women were unable to differentiate violent men, they described using a process of "testing" male acquaintances and future boyfriends to assess their potential for violence. "Testing" was an attempt to predict potentially violent men prior to developing relationships with them. The process of "testing" was accomplished by comparing identified behaviors of men to consciously constructed criteria based on their past experiences of abuse. "Testing" consisted of listening and observing how men talked about and treated other women and children in their lives, especially their mothers and sisters. Some women would intentionally incite men's reactions by discussing religion or politics, disagreeing with them, or starting an argument and then watching for physical and behavioral changes, such as "turning red" or raising their voices, that signified the man's potential for violence. IMPLICATIONS: The significance of this research is in identifying empowering strategies used by women to protect themselves and prevent entering another violent relationship. It is especially important in dispelling stereotypes and myths of battled women as passive and helpless victims. Identifying potential indicators of battering men has applications for prevention such as educating young women about warning signs and targeting prevention programs to "at-risk" men.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:51Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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