Comparison of Matched Samples of White and African-American Smokers on Perceptions about Smoking Cessation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166135
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Matched Samples of White and African-American Smokers on Perceptions about Smoking Cessation
Author(s):
Macnee, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Macnee, PhD, East Tennessee State University College of Nursing, Johnson City, Tennessee, USA, email: macneec@etsu.edu
Abstract:
African-Americans smoke fewer cigarettes, smoke cigarettes with higher tar and nicotine content, are more likely to smoke their first cigarette within 10 minutes of awakening, begin smoking at an later age, and are less likely to succeed in quitting smoking than White smokers from comparable backgrounds (Ahijevych & Wewers, 1993; Geronimus, Beidert & Bound, 1992; Royce, Hymowitz, Corbett, Hartwell & Orlandi, 1993). These differences support the need to better understand factors which influence smoking and the process of quitting smoking in African-Americans. The aim of this study is to compare perceptions regarding barriers to smoking cessation between White and African-American smokers. The specific research question addressed was: Do perceived barriers to smoking cessation differ between White and African-American smokers matched for age, gender and education? Data for this study will be acquired from two sources. Preliminary comparisons of perceived barriers to smoking cessation for matched samples of Whites (n=10) and African-Americans (n=10) have been completed using secondary analysis of data from a six month longitudinal study of self-quitters. Currently a descriptive examining perceived barriers to quitting smoking among African-Americans is being implemented with an expected sample size of 25 subjects. These subjects also will be matched on the variables of age, gender and education with a sample of White individuals drawn from the investigator's previous longitudinal study (N=157). The two sets of matched samples will be combined in order to create a final sample of approximately 70 subjects (35 White and 35 African-American). In both the previous study and the current descriptive study subjects complete a written questionnaire which includes the Barriers of Cessation Scale (BCS) (Macnee & Talsma, 1995). Analysis will include independent t-tests and tests of association to assure that the samples are comparable. Total mean scores of the BCS, as well as mean ratings of each of the 19 items will be examined for differences between White and African-American smokers. Preliminary analysis with the matched samples of 10 White and 10 African-American subjects indicate potential differences in responses to barrier items regarding weight gain, sense of control of moods, social support for smoking, and support in experiencing the process of quitting smoking. Preliminary analysis does not suggest that total barriers scores will differ between African-American and White smokers. Clinical and empirical implications will be described.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Matched Samples of White and African-American Smokers on Perceptions about Smoking Cessationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacnee, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Macnee, PhD, East Tennessee State University College of Nursing, Johnson City, Tennessee, USA, email: macneec@etsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166135-
dc.description.abstractAfrican-Americans smoke fewer cigarettes, smoke cigarettes with higher tar and nicotine content, are more likely to smoke their first cigarette within 10 minutes of awakening, begin smoking at an later age, and are less likely to succeed in quitting smoking than White smokers from comparable backgrounds (Ahijevych & Wewers, 1993; Geronimus, Beidert & Bound, 1992; Royce, Hymowitz, Corbett, Hartwell & Orlandi, 1993). These differences support the need to better understand factors which influence smoking and the process of quitting smoking in African-Americans. The aim of this study is to compare perceptions regarding barriers to smoking cessation between White and African-American smokers. The specific research question addressed was: Do perceived barriers to smoking cessation differ between White and African-American smokers matched for age, gender and education? Data for this study will be acquired from two sources. Preliminary comparisons of perceived barriers to smoking cessation for matched samples of Whites (n=10) and African-Americans (n=10) have been completed using secondary analysis of data from a six month longitudinal study of self-quitters. Currently a descriptive examining perceived barriers to quitting smoking among African-Americans is being implemented with an expected sample size of 25 subjects. These subjects also will be matched on the variables of age, gender and education with a sample of White individuals drawn from the investigator's previous longitudinal study (N=157). The two sets of matched samples will be combined in order to create a final sample of approximately 70 subjects (35 White and 35 African-American). In both the previous study and the current descriptive study subjects complete a written questionnaire which includes the Barriers of Cessation Scale (BCS) (Macnee & Talsma, 1995). Analysis will include independent t-tests and tests of association to assure that the samples are comparable. Total mean scores of the BCS, as well as mean ratings of each of the 19 items will be examined for differences between White and African-American smokers. Preliminary analysis with the matched samples of 10 White and 10 African-American subjects indicate potential differences in responses to barrier items regarding weight gain, sense of control of moods, social support for smoking, and support in experiencing the process of quitting smoking. Preliminary analysis does not suggest that total barriers scores will differ between African-American and White smokers. Clinical and empirical implications will be described.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:55Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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