2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health-promoting life styles of black and white women
Author(s):
Nies, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Nies, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: m.nies@wayne.edu
Abstract:
The long range goals of this program of research are to: 1) increase the physical fitness of African-American (AA) and Euro-American (EA) women, particularly low-income women, and 2) provide information regarding the outcomes of an intervention that can be easily used by primary care providers who frequently counsel women in their practice setting. Little attention has been given to women particularly those of low income, for testing exercise interventions that could increase physical activity and potentially and in improving physiological and psychological health outcomes. Therefore, the specific aim of this research is to test a potentially cost-effective nursing interventions to increase physical activity in sedentary AA and EA women. indeed, one of the unachieved exercise objectives for 1990 identified by the U.S. Public Health Service was for the regular participation in physical activity by 60% of the adult population by the year 1990. Epidemiological estimates suggest that greater than 40% of the 18 to 65-year-old adults in the nation are completely sedentary. Physical activity may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease through its effects on the cardiovascular system by increasing VO2 max and decreasing body mass index (BMI) and % body fat. In addition, exercise has improved mood by reducing symptoms of anxiety, relieving mild depression, and improving self-esteem. The primary outcome of this study is physical activity (measured by the 7-Day physical activity recall: PAR); secondary outcomes are indicators of physical fitness (estimated VO2 max, % body fat, BMI), and mood (measured by the Profile of Mood States). A 3 group randomized clinical trial will be conducted, 300 women varying in race (50% AA and 50% EA), age (30-60 years), and income (50% low-income) will be randomly assigned to (1) Telephone Exercise Counseling by a nurse over 24 weeks; (2) Attention Control; or (3) No Attention Control). All participants will be told to walk for 90 minutes/week, spread over 6 or more occasions. It is hypothesized that women who participate in the intervention will have greater physical activity, as determined by the PAR and validated by the Rockport 1-mile walk test, compared to the two control groups at 6 and 12 months. The hypothesis will be analyzed using repeated measures MANOVA with planned contrasts. In addition, 6 research questions will be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth-promoting life styles of black and white womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNies, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Nies, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: m.nies@wayne.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166140-
dc.description.abstractThe long range goals of this program of research are to: 1) increase the physical fitness of African-American (AA) and Euro-American (EA) women, particularly low-income women, and 2) provide information regarding the outcomes of an intervention that can be easily used by primary care providers who frequently counsel women in their practice setting. Little attention has been given to women particularly those of low income, for testing exercise interventions that could increase physical activity and potentially and in improving physiological and psychological health outcomes. Therefore, the specific aim of this research is to test a potentially cost-effective nursing interventions to increase physical activity in sedentary AA and EA women. indeed, one of the unachieved exercise objectives for 1990 identified by the U.S. Public Health Service was for the regular participation in physical activity by 60% of the adult population by the year 1990. Epidemiological estimates suggest that greater than 40% of the 18 to 65-year-old adults in the nation are completely sedentary. Physical activity may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease through its effects on the cardiovascular system by increasing VO2 max and decreasing body mass index (BMI) and % body fat. In addition, exercise has improved mood by reducing symptoms of anxiety, relieving mild depression, and improving self-esteem. The primary outcome of this study is physical activity (measured by the 7-Day physical activity recall: PAR); secondary outcomes are indicators of physical fitness (estimated VO2 max, % body fat, BMI), and mood (measured by the Profile of Mood States). A 3 group randomized clinical trial will be conducted, 300 women varying in race (50% AA and 50% EA), age (30-60 years), and income (50% low-income) will be randomly assigned to (1) Telephone Exercise Counseling by a nurse over 24 weeks; (2) Attention Control; or (3) No Attention Control). All participants will be told to walk for 90 minutes/week, spread over 6 or more occasions. It is hypothesized that women who participate in the intervention will have greater physical activity, as determined by the PAR and validated by the Rockport 1-mile walk test, compared to the two control groups at 6 and 12 months. The hypothesis will be analyzed using repeated measures MANOVA with planned contrasts. In addition, 6 research questions will be addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:01Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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