Emergency room utilization by public housing residents: Implications for a community nursing center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166141
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency room utilization by public housing residents: Implications for a community nursing center
Author(s):
Glick, Doris
Author Details:
Doris Glick, PhD, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: DFG6X@virginia.edu
Abstract:
Studies reveal that between 35 and 51% of all emergency room visits are for primary care that could have been treated in a physician's office or other primary care site. Members of racial and ethnic minority groups and those of low socioeconomic status are often dependent upon ERs as a regular source of care due to barriers to access and lack of primary care provider. The aim of this descriptive study is to evaluate the utilization of emergency room services by residents of two public housing units in a mid-Atlantic community of approximately 50,000. One unit houses elderly and disabled individuals and other houses predominantly women and children. Frequency of ER visits, ER diagnosis, services received, level of care (acuity) of ER visits, and costs of ER care were evaluated to determine why public housing residents use the ER and at what cost. Data were obtained retrospectively from hospital medical records and financial databases for all residents of the public housing units who utlized the ER over a two year period. Preliminary findings show that 1645 ER visits were made by 499 residents of the two public housing units in 1993 and 1994. Mean cost per visit was $85 with a range of $0 to $3,605. Between 46% and 76% of all ER visits were of a level of care that could have been provided by a primary care nurse pracitioner. Further analyses on the collected data will be completed by the conference data. These data and analyses serve as baseline ER utilization by the populations prior to the establishment of two nurse-managed primary care clinics on-site at the two public housing units. The nursing clinics have the potential to provide convenient, cost-effective primary care to the socioeconomically disadvantaged while decreasing the misuse of the hospital ER for non-emergent services by this vulnerable population. The use of the ER for non-emergent, primary care by public housing residents as demonstrated by this study serves to validate the need to identify alternative delivery systems which provide more cost-effective ways to provide comparable services.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency room utilization by public housing residents: Implications for a community nursing centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGlick, Dorisen_US
dc.author.detailsDoris Glick, PhD, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: DFG6X@virginia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166141-
dc.description.abstractStudies reveal that between 35 and 51% of all emergency room visits are for primary care that could have been treated in a physician's office or other primary care site. Members of racial and ethnic minority groups and those of low socioeconomic status are often dependent upon ERs as a regular source of care due to barriers to access and lack of primary care provider. The aim of this descriptive study is to evaluate the utilization of emergency room services by residents of two public housing units in a mid-Atlantic community of approximately 50,000. One unit houses elderly and disabled individuals and other houses predominantly women and children. Frequency of ER visits, ER diagnosis, services received, level of care (acuity) of ER visits, and costs of ER care were evaluated to determine why public housing residents use the ER and at what cost. Data were obtained retrospectively from hospital medical records and financial databases for all residents of the public housing units who utlized the ER over a two year period. Preliminary findings show that 1645 ER visits were made by 499 residents of the two public housing units in 1993 and 1994. Mean cost per visit was $85 with a range of $0 to $3,605. Between 46% and 76% of all ER visits were of a level of care that could have been provided by a primary care nurse pracitioner. Further analyses on the collected data will be completed by the conference data. These data and analyses serve as baseline ER utilization by the populations prior to the establishment of two nurse-managed primary care clinics on-site at the two public housing units. The nursing clinics have the potential to provide convenient, cost-effective primary care to the socioeconomically disadvantaged while decreasing the misuse of the hospital ER for non-emergent services by this vulnerable population. The use of the ER for non-emergent, primary care by public housing residents as demonstrated by this study serves to validate the need to identify alternative delivery systems which provide more cost-effective ways to provide comparable services.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:03Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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