2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166144
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Natural Feeding Histories of Preterm Infants
Author(s):
Pickler, Rita
Author Details:
Rita Pickler, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Doctoral Candidate, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: rita.pickler@cchmc.org
Abstract:
Babies who are born early often have to stay in the hospital for weeks or months. One reason they stay so long is that they need to be able to eat well from abottle before they go home. This study looked at the physical characteristics ofthese babies to see if these characteristics could be used to tell when a baby would be ready to eat and go home. The hospital charts of 40 babies who were born early were reviewed for birth weight, daily weights, amount of formula taken and other information about how sick a baby was. We found that birth weight and the number of days the baby was on a respirator were good predictors of when a baby would first eat from a bottle, when a baby would be able to eat completely from a bottle, and when a baby would go home. The information is important for nurses and others who take care of these small babies. Information like this helps us to work with parents in planning for the baby's discharge from the hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNatural Feeding Histories of Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPickler, Ritaen_US
dc.author.detailsRita Pickler, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Doctoral Candidate, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: rita.pickler@cchmc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166144-
dc.description.abstractBabies who are born early often have to stay in the hospital for weeks or months. One reason they stay so long is that they need to be able to eat well from abottle before they go home. This study looked at the physical characteristics ofthese babies to see if these characteristics could be used to tell when a baby would be ready to eat and go home. The hospital charts of 40 babies who were born early were reviewed for birth weight, daily weights, amount of formula taken and other information about how sick a baby was. We found that birth weight and the number of days the baby was on a respirator were good predictors of when a baby would first eat from a bottle, when a baby would be able to eat completely from a bottle, and when a baby would go home. The information is important for nurses and others who take care of these small babies. Information like this helps us to work with parents in planning for the baby's discharge from the hospital.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:06Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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