We're Not as Close as We Think: Client-Provider Perspectives of Health Outcomesand Quality of Living

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166146
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
We're Not as Close as We Think: Client-Provider Perspectives of Health Outcomesand Quality of Living
Author(s):
Russell, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Russell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee-Memphis College of Nursing, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: crussell@uthsc.edu
Abstract:
The increasing incidence and prevalence of heart failure (HF) and obstructive pulmonary disease (PD) contributes to their designation as growing public health problems. Medical treatments and lifestyle changes can delay the progression of these diseases, yet research and daily practice suggest that many people do not fully undertake the extensive changes and activities that would lead to the most positive outcomes. The suggested interventions may be ineffective, or they may be irrelevant to the population they are designed to help. Before designing new interventions that may or may not improve clients' health outcomes, empirical research of client and provider perspectives is required. The specific aims of this study were to identify factors that clients and their primary health care providers (PHCPs) perceived as contributing to their health outcomes and determine the congruence of client-provider perspectives. The research questions were (a) What are client and provider perceptions of factors contributing to hospitalizations and quality of living? (b) What is the degree of congruence of client and provider perspectives? Persons meeting the study criteria (admits with HF or PD, hospitalized in any but the intensive care units, male gender, at ieast 40 years of age, stable condition, able to speak & understand English & provide informed consent) were consecutively enrolled in the study. A total of 33 persons with HF and 30 persons with PD participated. The study was a prospective descriptive design with three components. First, semi-structured interviews were conducted with persons admitted to a Mid-South VA hospital. Next, semi-structured interviews were conducted with client identified PHCPs. Finally, reviews of each client's medical record were conducted. Data analysis began with the identification and comparison of meaningful text units in each interview. Then, within group (HF; PD; PHCP) and between group (HF-PHCP; PD-PHCP; HF,PD-PHCP) similarities and differences were examined to identify common and unique themes, patterns, and interrelationships. Findings were connected into an explanatory-descriptive framework that succinctly described factors contributing to health outcomes and quality of living. Clients and PHCPs identified (a) reasons for admissions (extrinsic & intrinsic) and (b) ways admissions could have been prevented (lifestyle changes, treatment modifications, more frequent follow-up, nothing). For both categories, total client-PHCP congruence was extremely low (10-15%). Examples of responses will be presented. Other factors that may explain the lack of congruence (i.e., length of client-PHCP relationship, length of time between last client-PHCP contact & admission, type of PHCP) will be described. The findings indicate that clients and PHCPs are not communicating at the same level about the same concerns. This lack of congruence may lead to more negative health outcomes and decreased quality of living for clients with these diseases. Strategies identified from this study that may foster client-PHCP communication and increase congruence will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWe're Not as Close as We Think: Client-Provider Perspectives of Health Outcomesand Quality of Livingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Russell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee-Memphis College of Nursing, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: crussell@uthsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166146-
dc.description.abstractThe increasing incidence and prevalence of heart failure (HF) and obstructive pulmonary disease (PD) contributes to their designation as growing public health problems. Medical treatments and lifestyle changes can delay the progression of these diseases, yet research and daily practice suggest that many people do not fully undertake the extensive changes and activities that would lead to the most positive outcomes. The suggested interventions may be ineffective, or they may be irrelevant to the population they are designed to help. Before designing new interventions that may or may not improve clients' health outcomes, empirical research of client and provider perspectives is required. The specific aims of this study were to identify factors that clients and their primary health care providers (PHCPs) perceived as contributing to their health outcomes and determine the congruence of client-provider perspectives. The research questions were (a) What are client and provider perceptions of factors contributing to hospitalizations and quality of living? (b) What is the degree of congruence of client and provider perspectives? Persons meeting the study criteria (admits with HF or PD, hospitalized in any but the intensive care units, male gender, at ieast 40 years of age, stable condition, able to speak & understand English & provide informed consent) were consecutively enrolled in the study. A total of 33 persons with HF and 30 persons with PD participated. The study was a prospective descriptive design with three components. First, semi-structured interviews were conducted with persons admitted to a Mid-South VA hospital. Next, semi-structured interviews were conducted with client identified PHCPs. Finally, reviews of each client's medical record were conducted. Data analysis began with the identification and comparison of meaningful text units in each interview. Then, within group (HF; PD; PHCP) and between group (HF-PHCP; PD-PHCP; HF,PD-PHCP) similarities and differences were examined to identify common and unique themes, patterns, and interrelationships. Findings were connected into an explanatory-descriptive framework that succinctly described factors contributing to health outcomes and quality of living. Clients and PHCPs identified (a) reasons for admissions (extrinsic & intrinsic) and (b) ways admissions could have been prevented (lifestyle changes, treatment modifications, more frequent follow-up, nothing). For both categories, total client-PHCP congruence was extremely low (10-15%). Examples of responses will be presented. Other factors that may explain the lack of congruence (i.e., length of client-PHCP relationship, length of time between last client-PHCP contact & admission, type of PHCP) will be described. The findings indicate that clients and PHCPs are not communicating at the same level about the same concerns. This lack of congruence may lead to more negative health outcomes and decreased quality of living for clients with these diseases. Strategies identified from this study that may foster client-PHCP communication and increase congruence will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:09Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.