2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166147
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Monitoring early discharge in cardiac surgery patients
Author(s):
Savage, Laura
Author Details:
Laura Savage, MSN, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: lsavage@gems.vcu.edu
Abstract:
Patients undergoing cardiac surgery, (coronary artery bypass grating and valve replacement), are being discharged sooner. The average length of stay is 5-7 days (Rudisill, Phillips & Payne, 1994). Approximately 35% of our patients are now discharged on post-operative day 5 or sooner (fast-track). Tack and Gilliss (1990) found that the frequency of health-related problems occurred during the first 8 weeks of recovery. With the implementation of a fast-track critical pathway for cardiac surgery patients which more consistently ensures early discharge for this population, concerns about nursing requirements in the early discharge phase became apparent. This descriptive study reports patient identified health problems and the role of the advanced practice nurse after hospital discharge. The cardiovascular clinical nurse specialist is a major informatian resource and care coordinator for this patient population. The cardiovascular clinical nurse specialist followed all cardiac surgery patients discharged from the fast-track critical path with one telephone interview between 7-14 days after hospital discharge. Over the last 18 months 250 cardiac surgery patients have been interviewed. The telephone interview began with an open ended question "How are you doing?" to elicit the patient's perception of the early phase of recovery from surgery. The patients were allowed to express concerns in a nondirected fashion. During the interview, the nurse recorded detailed notes on the patient's responses, using the patient's own words as much as possible. Additional questions were then used to ask about certain areas of recovery that have been previously identified as problematic such as sleep pattern disturbance, pain, wound healing, altered activity patterns and nutrition (Nicklin, 1986; Tack & Gilliss, 1990). Preliminary content analysis of the phone interviews identified recurrent themes including sleep pattern disturbance, pain, and altered nutrition. The advanced practice nurse's impact includes medication teaching and reinforcement, physician referral, instruction on risk factor modification, pain management and reassurance related to patient progress. This study serves to identify health problems encountered within the first 2 weeks of discharge and interventions of the advanced practice nurses. Nurses can anticipate these responses and better prepare patients and their families for postoperative recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMonitoring early discharge in cardiac surgery patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsLaura Savage, MSN, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: lsavage@gems.vcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166147-
dc.description.abstractPatients undergoing cardiac surgery, (coronary artery bypass grating and valve replacement), are being discharged sooner. The average length of stay is 5-7 days (Rudisill, Phillips & Payne, 1994). Approximately 35% of our patients are now discharged on post-operative day 5 or sooner (fast-track). Tack and Gilliss (1990) found that the frequency of health-related problems occurred during the first 8 weeks of recovery. With the implementation of a fast-track critical pathway for cardiac surgery patients which more consistently ensures early discharge for this population, concerns about nursing requirements in the early discharge phase became apparent. This descriptive study reports patient identified health problems and the role of the advanced practice nurse after hospital discharge. The cardiovascular clinical nurse specialist is a major informatian resource and care coordinator for this patient population. The cardiovascular clinical nurse specialist followed all cardiac surgery patients discharged from the fast-track critical path with one telephone interview between 7-14 days after hospital discharge. Over the last 18 months 250 cardiac surgery patients have been interviewed. The telephone interview began with an open ended question "How are you doing?" to elicit the patient's perception of the early phase of recovery from surgery. The patients were allowed to express concerns in a nondirected fashion. During the interview, the nurse recorded detailed notes on the patient's responses, using the patient's own words as much as possible. Additional questions were then used to ask about certain areas of recovery that have been previously identified as problematic such as sleep pattern disturbance, pain, wound healing, altered activity patterns and nutrition (Nicklin, 1986; Tack & Gilliss, 1990). Preliminary content analysis of the phone interviews identified recurrent themes including sleep pattern disturbance, pain, and altered nutrition. The advanced practice nurse's impact includes medication teaching and reinforcement, physician referral, instruction on risk factor modification, pain management and reassurance related to patient progress. This study serves to identify health problems encountered within the first 2 weeks of discharge and interventions of the advanced practice nurses. Nurses can anticipate these responses and better prepare patients and their families for postoperative recovery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:10Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.