An Evaluation of Elderly Peer Volunteers Functioning as Educators in a RuralWellness Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166148
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evaluation of Elderly Peer Volunteers Functioning as Educators in a RuralWellness Program
Author(s):
Sigsby, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Sigsby, MS/MSc, Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: lmsigsby@nursing.ufl.edu
Abstract:
Introduction: With a burgeoning elderly population expected to crest in the year 2020, health care providers are concerned about methods for keeping elders healthy and functioning at optimum levels. Many elders are productive members of society, yet some young professionals tend to focus on ageism and negative attitudes related to elderly in health care literature. Adaptations of teaching methods to meet physical changes occurring during aging is another frequently addressed issue in the literature. When elders were used as health care educators, elders were placed in the role of client, rather than in a leadership role. However, one study using elderly educators to increase colorectal screening demonstrated a significant difference from those not using elders. Purpose: The purposes of this pilot study are to evaluate the reasons for elderly educators' participation, their teaching strategies, and the effects of their teaching on other elders participating in a rural wellness program. Method: A convenience sample will be obtained from a population of 42 volunteer elderly educators and from elderly participants in five categories of wellness activities conducted in a wellness center located in a rural southern retirement community. The educators and participants are part of 500 residents living independently in this community. A structured interview using the Volunteer Guide will be used with the educators during orientation. Another structured interview, the Peer Participant Guide, will serve as a framework to gain information from participants. Three observations in classes will be made for each of the five wellness activities of walking, cardiovascular training, strength training, swimming lessons, and aquatic aerobics. Classes will be monitored for educational strategies including realistic goal attainment, learning reinforcement, demonstrations and practice of procedures, memory reminders or cued recall. Data will be collected over a three month period and analyzed by December, 1995. Qualitative data will be analyzed using latent content analysis (Field & Morse, 1985) with categories established through literature review. A panel of three expert nurses with educational experience and knowledge of physical changes in the elderly will be used to establish internal consistency in observations and analysis. Results: The results of this study have implications for fostering the maximum wellness potential for elderly residents in retirement and long term care facilities. The information will also form the basis for ongoing longitudinal studies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evaluation of Elderly Peer Volunteers Functioning as Educators in a RuralWellness Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSigsby, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Sigsby, MS/MSc, Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: lmsigsby@nursing.ufl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166148-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: With a burgeoning elderly population expected to crest in the year 2020, health care providers are concerned about methods for keeping elders healthy and functioning at optimum levels. Many elders are productive members of society, yet some young professionals tend to focus on ageism and negative attitudes related to elderly in health care literature. Adaptations of teaching methods to meet physical changes occurring during aging is another frequently addressed issue in the literature. When elders were used as health care educators, elders were placed in the role of client, rather than in a leadership role. However, one study using elderly educators to increase colorectal screening demonstrated a significant difference from those not using elders. Purpose: The purposes of this pilot study are to evaluate the reasons for elderly educators' participation, their teaching strategies, and the effects of their teaching on other elders participating in a rural wellness program. Method: A convenience sample will be obtained from a population of 42 volunteer elderly educators and from elderly participants in five categories of wellness activities conducted in a wellness center located in a rural southern retirement community. The educators and participants are part of 500 residents living independently in this community. A structured interview using the Volunteer Guide will be used with the educators during orientation. Another structured interview, the Peer Participant Guide, will serve as a framework to gain information from participants. Three observations in classes will be made for each of the five wellness activities of walking, cardiovascular training, strength training, swimming lessons, and aquatic aerobics. Classes will be monitored for educational strategies including realistic goal attainment, learning reinforcement, demonstrations and practice of procedures, memory reminders or cued recall. Data will be collected over a three month period and analyzed by December, 1995. Qualitative data will be analyzed using latent content analysis (Field & Morse, 1985) with categories established through literature review. A panel of three expert nurses with educational experience and knowledge of physical changes in the elderly will be used to establish internal consistency in observations and analysis. Results: The results of this study have implications for fostering the maximum wellness potential for elderly residents in retirement and long term care facilities. The information will also form the basis for ongoing longitudinal studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:11Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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