2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166149
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experiences of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Cancer
Author(s):
Steeves, Richard
Author Details:
Richard Steeves, PhD, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: rhs2p@Virginia.EDU
Abstract:
The purpose of this qualitative study was to add to the understanding of the experiences of rural, southern, informal caregivers of people dying of cancer. Although there is an impressive growing literature on caregivers, caregivers of people with terminal cancer and caregivers in the underserved rural south have not been targeted before, and their experiences are poorly understood. The sample (N=32) was recruited through two hospices that serve rural central Virginia. Eleven males and 21 females (a mean age of 57.8 years). Seventeen caregivers were caring for a spouse. Most of the remainder cared for a parent; although siblings, adult children, and friends were represented. Seventy-eight percent of the sample were white and 22% African Americans. Although diagnoses varied widely, the largest single diagnosis was lung cancer (21%). Data collection consisted of open-ended serial interviews: one approximately one week after entry into the hospice program, a second three weeks later, and a final interview six weeks after the death. A total of 103 interviews were completed. A subsample of four informants was followed more closely and over a longer period than the rest of the sample. Participant observation techniques including attending funerals, wedding anniversaries, church services, and other events. In order to answer the question `What is it like to care for a person dying of cancer in the rural south?' The story of each informant's experiences was compiled and treated as a text. Hermeneutic techniques were used to analyze these texts. The analysis involved taking a text and through a circular movement of continually comparing the details of the text with an understanding of the whole text. Findings are numerous including the burdens and rewards of caregiving, the loss they were experiencing and their grief. Specific tasks emerged and will be discussed in this presentation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperiences of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSteeves, Richarden_US
dc.author.detailsRichard Steeves, PhD, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: rhs2p@Virginia.EDUen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166149-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this qualitative study was to add to the understanding of the experiences of rural, southern, informal caregivers of people dying of cancer. Although there is an impressive growing literature on caregivers, caregivers of people with terminal cancer and caregivers in the underserved rural south have not been targeted before, and their experiences are poorly understood. The sample (N=32) was recruited through two hospices that serve rural central Virginia. Eleven males and 21 females (a mean age of 57.8 years). Seventeen caregivers were caring for a spouse. Most of the remainder cared for a parent; although siblings, adult children, and friends were represented. Seventy-eight percent of the sample were white and 22% African Americans. Although diagnoses varied widely, the largest single diagnosis was lung cancer (21%). Data collection consisted of open-ended serial interviews: one approximately one week after entry into the hospice program, a second three weeks later, and a final interview six weeks after the death. A total of 103 interviews were completed. A subsample of four informants was followed more closely and over a longer period than the rest of the sample. Participant observation techniques including attending funerals, wedding anniversaries, church services, and other events. In order to answer the question `What is it like to care for a person dying of cancer in the rural south?' The story of each informant's experiences was compiled and treated as a text. Hermeneutic techniques were used to analyze these texts. The analysis involved taking a text and through a circular movement of continually comparing the details of the text with an understanding of the whole text. Findings are numerous including the burdens and rewards of caregiving, the loss they were experiencing and their grief. Specific tasks emerged and will be discussed in this presentation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:12Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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