2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166150
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Angry? Let's Talk About It!
Author(s):
Thomas, Sandra
Author Details:
Sandra Thomas, PhD, Director, PhD Program, University of Tennessee College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: sthomas@utk.edu
Abstract:
Although there is heavy research activity in the area of pathogenic anger/hostility cognitions and behaviors, less is known about health-promoting or adaptive anger. Should health professionals tell their clients to hold anger in, vent it out, or simply avoid anger arousal? The purpose of this study was to explore one presumably healthy anger behavior (anger discussion) and its cognitve, behavioral, and physiologic correlates in a sample of health fair participants at a southeastern university. Subjects were students (59%), faculty and staff (41%) ranging in age from 18 to 77. The majority (84%) were Caucasian. There were 242 males and 219 females. The data included measures of blood pressure, weight, and height as well as self-reports of health attitudes and behaviors. Subjects who usually discuss their anger (roughly 45%) differed significantly from those who do not, in systolic BP (t=2.78, p<.006), diastolic BP (t=3.12, p<.002), body mass index (t=2.24, p<.03), self-efficacy (Chi square= 11.6, p<.001), aerobic exercise (Chi square=6.8, p<.009), regular checkups (Chi square=5.8, p<.02), perceived importance of health (Chi square=4.9, p<.03), and perceived health status (Chi square=8.3, p<.02). Gender specific correlational analyses revealed that for women, discussion of anger was inversely related to global assessment of stress level and to levels of environment specific stress at home and at work. Discussion of anger appears to be a health-promoting alternative to stuffing it or shouting it, although this mode of expression is seldom included in questionnaires. Implications for further research and clinical practice will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAngry? Let's Talk About It!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Thomas, PhD, Director, PhD Program, University of Tennessee College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: sthomas@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166150-
dc.description.abstractAlthough there is heavy research activity in the area of pathogenic anger/hostility cognitions and behaviors, less is known about health-promoting or adaptive anger. Should health professionals tell their clients to hold anger in, vent it out, or simply avoid anger arousal? The purpose of this study was to explore one presumably healthy anger behavior (anger discussion) and its cognitve, behavioral, and physiologic correlates in a sample of health fair participants at a southeastern university. Subjects were students (59%), faculty and staff (41%) ranging in age from 18 to 77. The majority (84%) were Caucasian. There were 242 males and 219 females. The data included measures of blood pressure, weight, and height as well as self-reports of health attitudes and behaviors. Subjects who usually discuss their anger (roughly 45%) differed significantly from those who do not, in systolic BP (t=2.78, p<.006), diastolic BP (t=3.12, p<.002), body mass index (t=2.24, p<.03), self-efficacy (Chi square= 11.6, p<.001), aerobic exercise (Chi square=6.8, p<.009), regular checkups (Chi square=5.8, p<.02), perceived importance of health (Chi square=4.9, p<.03), and perceived health status (Chi square=8.3, p<.02). Gender specific correlational analyses revealed that for women, discussion of anger was inversely related to global assessment of stress level and to levels of environment specific stress at home and at work. Discussion of anger appears to be a health-promoting alternative to stuffing it or shouting it, although this mode of expression is seldom included in questionnaires. Implications for further research and clinical practice will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:14Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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