2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166157
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rehabilitation Needs and Experiential Learning
Author(s):
Brown, Victoria
Author Details:
Victoria Brown, PhD, Georgia College & State University School of Health Sciences, Milledgeville, Georgia, USA, email: Vbrown@mail.gac.peachnet.edu
Abstract:
The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act estimates that over 43,000,000 Americans experience chronic health problems which require rehabilitation services. The number of people with disabilities is growing as the population ages and as modern medicine expands its ability to save and extend the lives of people who have experienced disabling disease or trauma (Batavia, 1993). Initial contact with these individuals by nursing students usually occurs in the acute care setting. Due to the complex needs of clients during this time and the limited experience of caring for individuals with disabilities, nursing students focus predominantly on short term goals directly related to acute care. The holistic rehabilitation needs of the client may not be incorporated into their plan of care. A study was conducted over a 5 year period at a Middle Georgia Baccalaureate School of Nursing to explore student responses to innovative rehabilitation learning experiences. Specific didactic and clinical experiences were designed to stimulate critical thinking and promote caring behaviors toward individuals with disabilities. Storytelling, journalling, gaming, and narrative papers were used to enhance and document experiential learning. Post activity conferences were used to validate the physiological, psychological, cognitive, and emotional experiences of having an imposed disability and caring for an individual with an actual disability. The results of this study indicated that students had strong cognitive and emotional responses to the learning experiences. Students reported having a higher level of personal awareness of the needs of individuals with disabilities and a stronger professional commitment to meeting these needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRehabilitation Needs and Experiential Learningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Victoriaen_US
dc.author.detailsVictoria Brown, PhD, Georgia College & State University School of Health Sciences, Milledgeville, Georgia, USA, email: Vbrown@mail.gac.peachnet.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166157-
dc.description.abstractThe 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act estimates that over 43,000,000 Americans experience chronic health problems which require rehabilitation services. The number of people with disabilities is growing as the population ages and as modern medicine expands its ability to save and extend the lives of people who have experienced disabling disease or trauma (Batavia, 1993). Initial contact with these individuals by nursing students usually occurs in the acute care setting. Due to the complex needs of clients during this time and the limited experience of caring for individuals with disabilities, nursing students focus predominantly on short term goals directly related to acute care. The holistic rehabilitation needs of the client may not be incorporated into their plan of care. A study was conducted over a 5 year period at a Middle Georgia Baccalaureate School of Nursing to explore student responses to innovative rehabilitation learning experiences. Specific didactic and clinical experiences were designed to stimulate critical thinking and promote caring behaviors toward individuals with disabilities. Storytelling, journalling, gaming, and narrative papers were used to enhance and document experiential learning. Post activity conferences were used to validate the physiological, psychological, cognitive, and emotional experiences of having an imposed disability and caring for an individual with an actual disability. The results of this study indicated that students had strong cognitive and emotional responses to the learning experiences. Students reported having a higher level of personal awareness of the needs of individuals with disabilities and a stronger professional commitment to meeting these needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:23Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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