2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166158
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sexually transmitted disease and woman abuse
Author(s):
Dimmitt, Jane
Author Details:
Jane Dimmitt, PhD, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: jdchampion@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Approximately 25-50% of women with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), have been found to be presently or previously involved in a physically or sexually abusive intimate relationship. Within these relationships, partner notification jeopardizes a woman's safety. Many women learn of STD infection during pregnancy, a time at which 25 to 63 percent of women who have been battered are abused. Long-term psychological effects associated with previous and present abuse may keep these women from effecting behavior changes to prevent reoccurrence of STDs and the potential harm to both the woman and her unborn child. Interventions for these women must be sensitive to the complex realities of their lives and offer realistic alternatives which allow protection from both abuse and STDs. Focus groups (4) were conducted at the Battered Women's Shelter to describe the experience for STDs in this population. This was followed by in-depth interviews to obtain life histories of women who had STDs and had experienced abuse. These interviews were conducted with thirty Mexican American and Black American women presenting for treatment of STDs at a metropolitan STD clinic who had also experienced abuse. The information obtained from the focus groups and life histories was used for protocol development for treatment suited for women with STDs who have experienced abuse. These study findings and treatment protocols will be presented. Issues addressed include commercial sex work, multiple partners, polysubstance abuse, sexuality, partner notification, contraception, gang activity and previous history of violence. Ethical issues concerning confidentiality, cultural diversity and decision-making are also addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSexually transmitted disease and woman abuseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDimmitt, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsJane Dimmitt, PhD, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: jdchampion@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166158-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 25-50% of women with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), have been found to be presently or previously involved in a physically or sexually abusive intimate relationship. Within these relationships, partner notification jeopardizes a woman's safety. Many women learn of STD infection during pregnancy, a time at which 25 to 63 percent of women who have been battered are abused. Long-term psychological effects associated with previous and present abuse may keep these women from effecting behavior changes to prevent reoccurrence of STDs and the potential harm to both the woman and her unborn child. Interventions for these women must be sensitive to the complex realities of their lives and offer realistic alternatives which allow protection from both abuse and STDs. Focus groups (4) were conducted at the Battered Women's Shelter to describe the experience for STDs in this population. This was followed by in-depth interviews to obtain life histories of women who had STDs and had experienced abuse. These interviews were conducted with thirty Mexican American and Black American women presenting for treatment of STDs at a metropolitan STD clinic who had also experienced abuse. The information obtained from the focus groups and life histories was used for protocol development for treatment suited for women with STDs who have experienced abuse. These study findings and treatment protocols will be presented. Issues addressed include commercial sex work, multiple partners, polysubstance abuse, sexuality, partner notification, contraception, gang activity and previous history of violence. Ethical issues concerning confidentiality, cultural diversity and decision-making are also addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:24Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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