2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166161
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge, attitudes and practice of nurses toward AIDS patient diagnosed with TB
Author(s):
Messmer, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Messmer, PhD, Director of Nursing Research, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, USA, email: pmessmer@msmc.com
Abstract:
Tuberculosis (TB) is especially compromising for AIDS patients and may precede that of AIDS in high risk patients. HIV patients are 40 times more likely to develop TB. Unlike other AIDS opportunistic infections, TB is readily transmissible to non-HIV-infected persons. PPD skin test is positive in only 40% of patients with HIV infection beacuse of anergy. There was an increase in 44% in one year of newly diagnosed TB cases with 10 being HIV+ at MSMC. During 1992-1993, of 2,949 health care works at MSMC, 1,150 were known to be PPD+ and 1,771 were know to be PPD-. Nurses caring for AIDS patients lacked knowledge of TB and the risk; 2 conversions were reported on a unit and 3 conversions on another unit. Education can increase knowledge and enhance acceptance of AIDS patients (Armstrong, 1990; Damrosch, 1990; Flaskenrud, 1991; Larson-Presswalla, 1993; & Peters, 1991). Few studies address nurses' knowledge and attitudes of AIDS patients diagnosed with TB. King's (1981) perception concept became the theretical basis; "Perception is each person's representation of reality". The purpose of this study was to determine if an educational program can improve nurses' attitudes, lvel of knowledge, and compliance with TB standards for AIDS patients. Research Questions: (1) Does an educational program increase knowledge level of AIDS and TB and enhance attitudes regarding risk of acquiring TB? (2) Is there a relationship between attitudes, knowledge level, and monitoring of clinical practice? The sample consisted of 50 staff nurses; experimental group of 35 (special immunology and medical-surgical nurses) and control group of 15 ICU nurses. Participants were administered a knowledge test and an attitude survey (Damrosch, 1990, with a Crombach's coefficient alpha of 0.79) and observed for compliance with infection control standards. The educational program consisted of a series of videotapes: "TB; or Not TB", "HIV and the Health Care Worker" and "TB: What Every Healthcare Worker Should Know"; CDC posters; and TB and AIDS articles. The control group did not receive the education. All particiapnts were re-administered the knowledge and attitude survey and observed for infection control standards post education. Demographic data revealed: 49 females and 1 male; mean age-38.02; education level-associate degree; ethnic background; Asian-19, AfroAmerican-17, Caucasian-10, and Hispanic-9; mean years in nursing-13.06 nad years spent at MSMC-10.37. The mean number of AIDS patients cared for-14.42; number of TB patients-12.73; and mean number of patients HIV with TB-4.5. A t-test (t=5.61) indicated that there was a significant difference in TB knowledge level but not a significant difference in AIDS knowledge level (t=1.64). There was a significant difference (t=6.73) for the outcome monitoring for the experimental group but not a significant difference in attitudes in all groups. There was a correlation (r=+.62) between TB knowledge and quality monitoring. Early detection/diagnosis and isolation of TB became a priority and referrals to Infection Control increase dramatically. Nurses began using the new high efficiency particulate respirator mask when caring for AIDS patients with TB. Compliance rate for PPD testing increase to 100% on the special immunology unit. This nursing research study resulted in improved clinical practice and supports the need for an on-going educational program with continual monitoring of infection control practices; thus positively affecting client and caregiver outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge, attitudes and practice of nurses toward AIDS patient diagnosed with TBen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMessmer, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Messmer, PhD, Director of Nursing Research, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, USA, email: pmessmer@msmc.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166161-
dc.description.abstractTuberculosis (TB) is especially compromising for AIDS patients and may precede that of AIDS in high risk patients. HIV patients are 40 times more likely to develop TB. Unlike other AIDS opportunistic infections, TB is readily transmissible to non-HIV-infected persons. PPD skin test is positive in only 40% of patients with HIV infection beacuse of anergy. There was an increase in 44% in one year of newly diagnosed TB cases with 10 being HIV+ at MSMC. During 1992-1993, of 2,949 health care works at MSMC, 1,150 were known to be PPD+ and 1,771 were know to be PPD-. Nurses caring for AIDS patients lacked knowledge of TB and the risk; 2 conversions were reported on a unit and 3 conversions on another unit. Education can increase knowledge and enhance acceptance of AIDS patients (Armstrong, 1990; Damrosch, 1990; Flaskenrud, 1991; Larson-Presswalla, 1993; & Peters, 1991). Few studies address nurses' knowledge and attitudes of AIDS patients diagnosed with TB. King's (1981) perception concept became the theretical basis; "Perception is each person's representation of reality". The purpose of this study was to determine if an educational program can improve nurses' attitudes, lvel of knowledge, and compliance with TB standards for AIDS patients. Research Questions: (1) Does an educational program increase knowledge level of AIDS and TB and enhance attitudes regarding risk of acquiring TB? (2) Is there a relationship between attitudes, knowledge level, and monitoring of clinical practice? The sample consisted of 50 staff nurses; experimental group of 35 (special immunology and medical-surgical nurses) and control group of 15 ICU nurses. Participants were administered a knowledge test and an attitude survey (Damrosch, 1990, with a Crombach's coefficient alpha of 0.79) and observed for compliance with infection control standards. The educational program consisted of a series of videotapes: "TB; or Not TB", "HIV and the Health Care Worker" and "TB: What Every Healthcare Worker Should Know"; CDC posters; and TB and AIDS articles. The control group did not receive the education. All particiapnts were re-administered the knowledge and attitude survey and observed for infection control standards post education. Demographic data revealed: 49 females and 1 male; mean age-38.02; education level-associate degree; ethnic background; Asian-19, AfroAmerican-17, Caucasian-10, and Hispanic-9; mean years in nursing-13.06 nad years spent at MSMC-10.37. The mean number of AIDS patients cared for-14.42; number of TB patients-12.73; and mean number of patients HIV with TB-4.5. A t-test (t=5.61) indicated that there was a significant difference in TB knowledge level but not a significant difference in AIDS knowledge level (t=1.64). There was a significant difference (t=6.73) for the outcome monitoring for the experimental group but not a significant difference in attitudes in all groups. There was a correlation (r=+.62) between TB knowledge and quality monitoring. Early detection/diagnosis and isolation of TB became a priority and referrals to Infection Control increase dramatically. Nurses began using the new high efficiency particulate respirator mask when caring for AIDS patients with TB. Compliance rate for PPD testing increase to 100% on the special immunology unit. This nursing research study resulted in improved clinical practice and supports the need for an on-going educational program with continual monitoring of infection control practices; thus positively affecting client and caregiver outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:28Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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