2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166162
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pulmonary rehabiliation in the home
Author(s):
Nield, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Nield, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of California/Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: mnield@ucla.edu
Abstract:
Pulmonary rehabilitation in the home for the frail with chronic lung disease is assumed to help maintain a level of wellness within the context of chronic illness and ultimately reduce health care costs. However, little is reported about what pulmonary rehabilitation services are provided and what patient problems are present for those with chronic lung disease in the home setting. The charts of seven adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease either listed for, or recipients of, a single lung transplant were reviewed retrospectively to identify the serviced provided and the potential/actual patient problems. Care was provided by RNs with advanced training in pulmonary rehabilitation or transplant care. Content analysis identified three major categories of services: assessment (environmental hazards, ability to perform activities of daily living, coping level); teaching (medications, signs and symptoms of infection, energy conservation, controlled breathing techniques, accessing care); monitoring (exercise). Patient problem categories were symptom changes, functional status, psychosocial adaptation, and pathophysiology. The retrospective chart audit failed to reveal the usual scope of pulmonary rehabilitation found in the traditional outpatient setting, but did identify probelms unique to the frail, chronically ill.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePulmonary rehabiliation in the homeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNield, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Nield, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of California/Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: mnield@ucla.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166162-
dc.description.abstractPulmonary rehabilitation in the home for the frail with chronic lung disease is assumed to help maintain a level of wellness within the context of chronic illness and ultimately reduce health care costs. However, little is reported about what pulmonary rehabilitation services are provided and what patient problems are present for those with chronic lung disease in the home setting. The charts of seven adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease either listed for, or recipients of, a single lung transplant were reviewed retrospectively to identify the serviced provided and the potential/actual patient problems. Care was provided by RNs with advanced training in pulmonary rehabilitation or transplant care. Content analysis identified three major categories of services: assessment (environmental hazards, ability to perform activities of daily living, coping level); teaching (medications, signs and symptoms of infection, energy conservation, controlled breathing techniques, accessing care); monitoring (exercise). Patient problem categories were symptom changes, functional status, psychosocial adaptation, and pathophysiology. The retrospective chart audit failed to reveal the usual scope of pulmonary rehabilitation found in the traditional outpatient setting, but did identify probelms unique to the frail, chronically ill.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:29Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.