2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166163
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hemodialysis induces chronic intermittent temperature elevations
Author(s):
Parker, Kathy
Author Details:
Kathy Parker, PhD, Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, email: KPARK04@nurse.emory.edu
Abstract:
During hemodialysis, the blood is run through an extracorporeal circuit and exposed to a synthetic semipermeable membrane and a dialysate bath in order to remove metabolic wastes. This procedure is frequently associated with post-dialysis temperature elevations which may be related to the activation of the compliment system and stimulation of interleukins. Because daily body temperature variation is an important circadian rhythm, the purpose of this study was to systematically examine the effect that dialysis has on body temperature and to determine if temperature changes vary with time of treatment. The oral temperatures of 60 patients, 10 men and 10 women in each of three groups based on time of treatment, were taken (using a Temp Plus II, Model 2080A digital thermometer) immediately prior to and following outpatient dialysis. Twenty subjects received treatment during Shift 1 (6 am to 10 am), 20 during the Shift 2 (10 am to 2 pm), and 20 during Shift 3 (2 pm to 6 pm). Data were collected for a two week period of time over six dialysis sessions. Data analysis demonstrated a significant increase in body temperature following dialysis in all subjects (P<0.001 by repeated measures ANOVA). No significant difference in the degree of temperature change was detected among groups of subjects based on the time of treatment. In addition, no significant difference was noted among these shifts in pre-dialysis temperatures. The means and standard deviations of the temperatures (degrees F) pre- and post-dialysis for the three groups of subjects and entire sample are presented in the table. Shift Pre-dialysis Temperature Post-dialysis Temperature 1 97.5 (0.61) 98.0 (0.36) 2 97.6 (0.52) 98.1 (0.47) 3 97.8 (0.50) 98.4 (0.32) Entire group 97.7 (0.51) 98.2 (0.43) The results of this study verify that hemodialysis significantly elevates body temperature. Chronically induced temperature elevations may contribute to the sleep/wake cycle abnormalities experienced by these patients. Of particular note is the apparent absence of time of day effects in pre-dialysis temperature measurements. Whether this implies circadian dysrhythmicity at the level of the individual patient is unknown, but this remains a possibility. A more detailed study designed to explore the role that dialysis-induced temperature elevations have on circadian sleep/wake rhythms of dialysis patients is currently underway.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHemodialysis induces chronic intermittent temperature elevationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParker, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Parker, PhD, Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, email: KPARK04@nurse.emory.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166163-
dc.description.abstractDuring hemodialysis, the blood is run through an extracorporeal circuit and exposed to a synthetic semipermeable membrane and a dialysate bath in order to remove metabolic wastes. This procedure is frequently associated with post-dialysis temperature elevations which may be related to the activation of the compliment system and stimulation of interleukins. Because daily body temperature variation is an important circadian rhythm, the purpose of this study was to systematically examine the effect that dialysis has on body temperature and to determine if temperature changes vary with time of treatment. The oral temperatures of 60 patients, 10 men and 10 women in each of three groups based on time of treatment, were taken (using a Temp Plus II, Model 2080A digital thermometer) immediately prior to and following outpatient dialysis. Twenty subjects received treatment during Shift 1 (6 am to 10 am), 20 during the Shift 2 (10 am to 2 pm), and 20 during Shift 3 (2 pm to 6 pm). Data were collected for a two week period of time over six dialysis sessions. Data analysis demonstrated a significant increase in body temperature following dialysis in all subjects (P<0.001 by repeated measures ANOVA). No significant difference in the degree of temperature change was detected among groups of subjects based on the time of treatment. In addition, no significant difference was noted among these shifts in pre-dialysis temperatures. The means and standard deviations of the temperatures (degrees F) pre- and post-dialysis for the three groups of subjects and entire sample are presented in the table. Shift Pre-dialysis Temperature Post-dialysis Temperature 1 97.5 (0.61) 98.0 (0.36) 2 97.6 (0.52) 98.1 (0.47) 3 97.8 (0.50) 98.4 (0.32) Entire group 97.7 (0.51) 98.2 (0.43) The results of this study verify that hemodialysis significantly elevates body temperature. Chronically induced temperature elevations may contribute to the sleep/wake cycle abnormalities experienced by these patients. Of particular note is the apparent absence of time of day effects in pre-dialysis temperature measurements. Whether this implies circadian dysrhythmicity at the level of the individual patient is unknown, but this remains a possibility. A more detailed study designed to explore the role that dialysis-induced temperature elevations have on circadian sleep/wake rhythms of dialysis patients is currently underway.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:30Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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