The Relationships Between Attitude Toward Using Adult Daycare, Asking for Help,and Burden in Adult Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166166
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationships Between Attitude Toward Using Adult Daycare, Asking for Help,and Burden in Adult Caregivers
Author(s):
Robinson, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Robinson, DNS, RN, CS, FAAN, Professor, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: kmrobi01@louisville.edu
Abstract:
Adult lay caregivers of persons with dementia experience negative attitudes about use of adult daycare and other community services. The relationships among attitude toward using adult daycare, asking for help, and objective and subjective burden were explored in a nonrandom sample (n=33) of adult caregivers. Subjects were recruited through a local Alzheimers (ADRDA) Chapter. Fifty-five percent of the caregivers did not utilize adult daycare. Those who did use adult daycare also reported that their family member exhibited more troublesome symptoms such as wandering, hallucinations, sleeping problems, etc. Caregivers who utilized other formal types of services also were more likely to have a family member attend adult daycare. Older caregivers used daycare more. A positive attitude toward adult daycare was correlated with more troublesome symptoms exhibited by a person with a dementing illness. Caregivers whose family members were incontinent had the most positive attitude toward adult daycare. Higher subjective burden was correlated with unhappy caregivers and caring for impaired persons experiencing more troublesome behaviors. Implications for nursing interventions and social policy will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationships Between Attitude Toward Using Adult Daycare, Asking for Help,and Burden in Adult Caregiversen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Robinson, DNS, RN, CS, FAAN, Professor, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: kmrobi01@louisville.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166166-
dc.description.abstractAdult lay caregivers of persons with dementia experience negative attitudes about use of adult daycare and other community services. The relationships among attitude toward using adult daycare, asking for help, and objective and subjective burden were explored in a nonrandom sample (n=33) of adult caregivers. Subjects were recruited through a local Alzheimers (ADRDA) Chapter. Fifty-five percent of the caregivers did not utilize adult daycare. Those who did use adult daycare also reported that their family member exhibited more troublesome symptoms such as wandering, hallucinations, sleeping problems, etc. Caregivers who utilized other formal types of services also were more likely to have a family member attend adult daycare. Older caregivers used daycare more. A positive attitude toward adult daycare was correlated with more troublesome symptoms exhibited by a person with a dementing illness. Caregivers whose family members were incontinent had the most positive attitude toward adult daycare. Higher subjective burden was correlated with unhappy caregivers and caring for impaired persons experiencing more troublesome behaviors. Implications for nursing interventions and social policy will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:34Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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