2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166171
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oral Health in Persons with HIV: Host and Microbial Factors
Author(s):
Waters, Haidee; Blankenship, Pamela; Farleigh, Denise; Ropka, Mary E.
Author Details:
Haidee Waters, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: hwaters@vcu.edu; Pamela Blankenship; Denise Farleigh; Mary E. Ropka
Abstract:
Persons infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) may experience oral manifestations which can contribute to problems in nutrition, hydration, pain, social isolation, potential for infection, compliance with therapies, and quality of life. Little is known about the oral health and health care practices of HIV infected persons throughout the spectrum of HIV infection and disease. A variety of oral protocols are empirically recommended to or used by HIV infected persons despite the lack of evidence of effectiveness of particular regimens in this population. This study describes oral health status and practices and quantifies selected oral flora and selected biological markers in the oral cavities of HIV infected persons. Subjects are being recruited at the time of routine care visits in an outpatient clinic specializing in the care of persons with HIV. Recruitment will continue until 100 subjects have been recruited with equal distribution into 4 CD4 strata reflecting severity of immunocompromise; twenty-four subjects have been recruited thus far. Concurrent and historical data regarding professional dental care and personal oral care practices, selected medical and nutritional information, and demographic information is obtained by interview. Oral cavity assessment is conducted by a registered dental hygienist and plaque index, debris index, periodontal health, current infections, and evidence of xerostomia are documented on standardized instruments. Quantitative microbiological analysis of oral swabs for selected aerobic, anaerobic, and fungal organisms is performed. Salivary lactoferrin levels (a marker of innate immunity) and salivary IgA levels (a marker of oral mucosal immunity) are determined quantitatively by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mean age of subjects to date is 33.4 years (range 27 to 44); both genders and all CD4 strata are represented. Preliminary analysis of data indicates that both prevalence of oral infections and severity of xerostomia increase as CD4 count decreases. Oral infections identified on examination include candidiasis, periodontitis, gingivitis, free margin erythema, hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Several subjects had multiple infections. In addition, microbiologic analysis revealed carriage of Candida species in subjects without clinical manifestations of candidiasis. Incidence of oral infections increased with length of time elapsed since last professional dental care. Positive correlations existed between debris, plaque, and gingival indices. However, self-report of tooth brushing frequency was not significantly associated with dental examination measures. Evaluation of lactoferrin and IgA in saliva of subjects is ongoing. Findings will provide a foundation for understanding progression of oral symptoms as immunocompetence decreases and for development and testing of oral care programs for HIV infected individuals throughout the course of infection and disease.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOral Health in Persons with HIV: Host and Microbial Factorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Haideeen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlankenship, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarleigh, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.authorRopka, Mary E.en_US
dc.author.detailsHaidee Waters, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: hwaters@vcu.edu; Pamela Blankenship; Denise Farleigh; Mary E. Ropkaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166171-
dc.description.abstractPersons infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) may experience oral manifestations which can contribute to problems in nutrition, hydration, pain, social isolation, potential for infection, compliance with therapies, and quality of life. Little is known about the oral health and health care practices of HIV infected persons throughout the spectrum of HIV infection and disease. A variety of oral protocols are empirically recommended to or used by HIV infected persons despite the lack of evidence of effectiveness of particular regimens in this population. This study describes oral health status and practices and quantifies selected oral flora and selected biological markers in the oral cavities of HIV infected persons. Subjects are being recruited at the time of routine care visits in an outpatient clinic specializing in the care of persons with HIV. Recruitment will continue until 100 subjects have been recruited with equal distribution into 4 CD4 strata reflecting severity of immunocompromise; twenty-four subjects have been recruited thus far. Concurrent and historical data regarding professional dental care and personal oral care practices, selected medical and nutritional information, and demographic information is obtained by interview. Oral cavity assessment is conducted by a registered dental hygienist and plaque index, debris index, periodontal health, current infections, and evidence of xerostomia are documented on standardized instruments. Quantitative microbiological analysis of oral swabs for selected aerobic, anaerobic, and fungal organisms is performed. Salivary lactoferrin levels (a marker of innate immunity) and salivary IgA levels (a marker of oral mucosal immunity) are determined quantitatively by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mean age of subjects to date is 33.4 years (range 27 to 44); both genders and all CD4 strata are represented. Preliminary analysis of data indicates that both prevalence of oral infections and severity of xerostomia increase as CD4 count decreases. Oral infections identified on examination include candidiasis, periodontitis, gingivitis, free margin erythema, hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Several subjects had multiple infections. In addition, microbiologic analysis revealed carriage of Candida species in subjects without clinical manifestations of candidiasis. Incidence of oral infections increased with length of time elapsed since last professional dental care. Positive correlations existed between debris, plaque, and gingival indices. However, self-report of tooth brushing frequency was not significantly associated with dental examination measures. Evaluation of lactoferrin and IgA in saliva of subjects is ongoing. Findings will provide a foundation for understanding progression of oral symptoms as immunocompetence decreases and for development and testing of oral care programs for HIV infected individuals throughout the course of infection and disease.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:41Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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