2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166172
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Portrait in professionalism: Imogene M. King
Author(s):
Messmer, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Messmer, PhD, Director of Nursing Research, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, USA, email: pmessmer@msmc.com
Abstract:
For nearly fifty years, Dr. Imogene King has participated in the strong evolutionary movement to carve out the unique discipline of nursing and is an internationally known scholar whose ideas have influenced nursing theory advancement worldwide (Parse, 1995). King's nursing experiences fostered the scientific theory research knowledge development in nursing. King's professional life supported intellectual pursuits for nurse educators, practitioners and nurse researchers. Contextual factors in King's professional life contributed to this nursing knowledge: mentorship, institutional setting, scientific collegiality, freedom of ideas, availability of resources and the ability to avoid overcommitment. The purpose of this historical research was to shed light on the process of scientific nursing knowledge development, as epitomized through King's life, legacy and contributions. Research objectives were to: 1) describe the context of the emergence of King's Conceptual Systems Framework and Theory of Goal Attainment; 2) portray the processes of knowledge development as a basis for nursing practice; and 3) identify factors within the nursing discipline that promote or impede nursing knowledge development. This historical study assumed an interactionist view between society, individual scientist; process & production of scientific knowledge (Berger & Luckmann, 1966). This descriptive case study approach reviewed primary & secondary sources. King and informants including family, friends, and colleagues provided & substantiated primary sources. Personal recollections, correspondence & photographs were reviewed & documented. King's life provided a view of the changes occuring in nursing's still newly emerging discipline, as well as illuminated general processes of nursing knowledge development. Nursing theory books, articles & the videotape, "Portraits of Excellence" provided pieces of King's biographical data. King was born 1923 in West Point, Iowa. King earned a diploma from St. John's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, 1945, and served as a clinical instructor 1947-51 and 1952-58. King completed her BSNE, 1948 and MSN, 1957 at St. Louis University. King studied under Mildred Montag at Columbia University, Teachers' College, receiving her EdD, 1961. King held academic positions at Loyola University, Chicago, Ohio State University and University of South Florida (Professor Emeritus). King served as Assistant Chief of Research Grants Branch, Division of Nursing, HEW, Washington, DC 1966-68. King served as a consultant and lecturer for University of Miami's doctoral program and other graduate and clinical programs. A Theory for Nursing: Systems, Concepts, Process (1981) and Curriculum and Instruction in Nursing (1986) are used world-wide. King presented at International Theory Conferences, 1978-96. American, Canadian, Sweden, & Japanese authors describe the impact of King's theory on research & practice in Advancing King's Systems Framework and Theory of Nursing (1995). King, a Sigma Theta Tau International Virginia Henderson fellow, received Elizabeth Russell Belford Founders Award for Excellence in Education, 1989. King, an American Academy of Nursing fellow, will receive ANA Jessie Scott Award at the 1996 ANA convention. King and informants' interview transcriptions formed an "ethnographic approach" for data collection. Patterns and themes of intellectual pursuits, commitment and dedication were interwoven with love and devotion for family, students and friends, arts (did abstract "energy" painting for Martha Rogers' 75th birthday), golfing, politics and daytime soap operas. King's life exemplifies intertwining of professional and personal responsibilities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePortrait in professionalism: Imogene M. Kingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMessmer, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Messmer, PhD, Director of Nursing Research, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, USA, email: pmessmer@msmc.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166172-
dc.description.abstractFor nearly fifty years, Dr. Imogene King has participated in the strong evolutionary movement to carve out the unique discipline of nursing and is an internationally known scholar whose ideas have influenced nursing theory advancement worldwide (Parse, 1995). King's nursing experiences fostered the scientific theory research knowledge development in nursing. King's professional life supported intellectual pursuits for nurse educators, practitioners and nurse researchers. Contextual factors in King's professional life contributed to this nursing knowledge: mentorship, institutional setting, scientific collegiality, freedom of ideas, availability of resources and the ability to avoid overcommitment. The purpose of this historical research was to shed light on the process of scientific nursing knowledge development, as epitomized through King's life, legacy and contributions. Research objectives were to: 1) describe the context of the emergence of King's Conceptual Systems Framework and Theory of Goal Attainment; 2) portray the processes of knowledge development as a basis for nursing practice; and 3) identify factors within the nursing discipline that promote or impede nursing knowledge development. This historical study assumed an interactionist view between society, individual scientist; process & production of scientific knowledge (Berger & Luckmann, 1966). This descriptive case study approach reviewed primary & secondary sources. King and informants including family, friends, and colleagues provided & substantiated primary sources. Personal recollections, correspondence & photographs were reviewed & documented. King's life provided a view of the changes occuring in nursing's still newly emerging discipline, as well as illuminated general processes of nursing knowledge development. Nursing theory books, articles & the videotape, "Portraits of Excellence" provided pieces of King's biographical data. King was born 1923 in West Point, Iowa. King earned a diploma from St. John's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, 1945, and served as a clinical instructor 1947-51 and 1952-58. King completed her BSNE, 1948 and MSN, 1957 at St. Louis University. King studied under Mildred Montag at Columbia University, Teachers' College, receiving her EdD, 1961. King held academic positions at Loyola University, Chicago, Ohio State University and University of South Florida (Professor Emeritus). King served as Assistant Chief of Research Grants Branch, Division of Nursing, HEW, Washington, DC 1966-68. King served as a consultant and lecturer for University of Miami's doctoral program and other graduate and clinical programs. A Theory for Nursing: Systems, Concepts, Process (1981) and Curriculum and Instruction in Nursing (1986) are used world-wide. King presented at International Theory Conferences, 1978-96. American, Canadian, Sweden, & Japanese authors describe the impact of King's theory on research & practice in Advancing King's Systems Framework and Theory of Nursing (1995). King, a Sigma Theta Tau International Virginia Henderson fellow, received Elizabeth Russell Belford Founders Award for Excellence in Education, 1989. King, an American Academy of Nursing fellow, will receive ANA Jessie Scott Award at the 1996 ANA convention. King and informants' interview transcriptions formed an "ethnographic approach" for data collection. Patterns and themes of intellectual pursuits, commitment and dedication were interwoven with love and devotion for family, students and friends, arts (did abstract "energy" painting for Martha Rogers' 75th birthday), golfing, politics and daytime soap operas. King's life exemplifies intertwining of professional and personal responsibilities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:42Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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