2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166173
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gaining Perspective: The History of Coronary Care, 1941-1970
Author(s):
Keeling, Arlene
Author Details:
Arlene Keeling, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: awk2z@Virginia.EDU
Abstract:
Rationale: In light of the political, social and economic realities of the 1990s, nursing is faced once again with a great deal of change; amidst a great deal of uncertainty. The challenges of the future need not be overwhelming if we look to our history. Historical research in nursing is uniquely able to (1) enhance our understanding of the past as context for present realities, and (2) provide the information necessary to evaluate and possibly recycle old solutions for use with present day challenges. This historical study traces the history of nursing in coronary care units (CCUs) in the United States, using the CCU at the University of Virginia as a microcosm of the national scene. Research questions: Several research questions were addressed in this paper: (1) How did the CCU at the University of Virginia develop? (2) What role did nursing play in its inception and implementation? (3) How did it reflect the trends in the development of critical care units that was taking place nationally? and (4) What can the history of CCU nursing tell us about future directions for nursing in critical care units? Methodology: Historical methods were used for this descriptive, exploratory study. Primary sources included personal letters, memos, notes, and minutes of meetings kept by Dr. Lockhart McGuire, and Miss Mary Jane Morris, RN. Oral interviews with Ms. Mary Jane Morris were also conducted. Secondary sources included textbooks and journal articles of the period. Findings: From its inception to its institution in 1968, the CCU at the University of Virginia was reflective of trends in the establishment of coronary care units throughout the U.S. In the development of new technologies and scientific advances, it had its origins. Adhering to suggestions in the reports of the original units, it developed. Throughout the process, one theme persisted: that nurses, combining caring, professionalism, and clinical expertise, were essential to the provision of the human side of highly technological care. Conclusions: In light of the rapidly changing and ever increasing technology available for the treatment of the critically ill, the proposed plans for the use of unlicensed care providers in intensive care units, and the new roles of acute care nurse practitioners, understanding our history can ease the stress of the present day critical care environment by giving us a sense of perspective. Divergent reactions can be anticipated. By retaining the essence of nursing, we can direct our future.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGaining Perspective: The History of Coronary Care, 1941-1970en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeeling, Arleneen_US
dc.author.detailsArlene Keeling, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: awk2z@Virginia.EDUen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166173-
dc.description.abstractRationale: In light of the political, social and economic realities of the 1990s, nursing is faced once again with a great deal of change; amidst a great deal of uncertainty. The challenges of the future need not be overwhelming if we look to our history. Historical research in nursing is uniquely able to (1) enhance our understanding of the past as context for present realities, and (2) provide the information necessary to evaluate and possibly recycle old solutions for use with present day challenges. This historical study traces the history of nursing in coronary care units (CCUs) in the United States, using the CCU at the University of Virginia as a microcosm of the national scene. Research questions: Several research questions were addressed in this paper: (1) How did the CCU at the University of Virginia develop? (2) What role did nursing play in its inception and implementation? (3) How did it reflect the trends in the development of critical care units that was taking place nationally? and (4) What can the history of CCU nursing tell us about future directions for nursing in critical care units? Methodology: Historical methods were used for this descriptive, exploratory study. Primary sources included personal letters, memos, notes, and minutes of meetings kept by Dr. Lockhart McGuire, and Miss Mary Jane Morris, RN. Oral interviews with Ms. Mary Jane Morris were also conducted. Secondary sources included textbooks and journal articles of the period. Findings: From its inception to its institution in 1968, the CCU at the University of Virginia was reflective of trends in the establishment of coronary care units throughout the U.S. In the development of new technologies and scientific advances, it had its origins. Adhering to suggestions in the reports of the original units, it developed. Throughout the process, one theme persisted: that nurses, combining caring, professionalism, and clinical expertise, were essential to the provision of the human side of highly technological care. Conclusions: In light of the rapidly changing and ever increasing technology available for the treatment of the critically ill, the proposed plans for the use of unlicensed care providers in intensive care units, and the new roles of acute care nurse practitioners, understanding our history can ease the stress of the present day critical care environment by giving us a sense of perspective. Divergent reactions can be anticipated. By retaining the essence of nursing, we can direct our future.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:43Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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