2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166176
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Injury Risk Behaviors in Children with Sick Cell Disease
Author(s):
Lobo, Marie
Author Details:
Marie Lobo, PhD, Assistant Professor, Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, email: lobom1@musc.edu
Abstract:
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common hereditary hematological disorder in humans. Based on their illness state children with SCD have many risks for impaired growth and development. Few studies have been done which address family or normal child development issues in African American families, much less in families with a child with SCD. Even less is known about the everyday normal childhood activities in which children with SCD participate. Children with SCD are more vulnerable to complications if they experience injury. This study had two aims: 1) to describe family functioning in families with a child with SCD and 2) to describe injury risk taking behaviors in children with SCD. This report will focus on injury risk behaviors and those protective actions taken by the family or child. Families were recruited from the pediatric sickle cell clinic in a major children's hospital in the Southeastern US. Most children were at clinic for routine monitoring. This sample includes the oldest child with SCD in 121 families. The majority of the respondents to the surveys were mothers. The average age of the child was 6.55 years (sd = 5.1; range 1 month to 17 years), 56.2% had Hemiglobin SS disease. Because of mandatory younger infants are being seen in the clinic for early preventive treatment. Average grade of those attending school is 4.9 (sd = 3.2) with only 68% in the appropriate grade level for age. 86 of the children had at least one hospitalization for an SCD event. Many of the children participated in age appropriate play activities, however few injury protection actions were initiated. 86% of the caregivers reported they lived in safe or very safe neighborhoods. The majority of the children lived in the suburbs or rural area, with only 19% living in urban areas. Thus, this sample lives in very different environments than most children with SCD who have been studied; with most published studies from metropolitan urban environments. While 58 of the children had bicycles only 11 had helmets which 5 of them never wore and oniy 1 child wore 100% of the time. Seven of the children had skateboards, 3 used protective equipment, only 1 child 100% of the time. 22 children swam, with 2 children never swimming where a life guard was present. Eighteen children played organized sports such as football, baseball, and basketball. Children with SCD participated in many activities which made them vulnerable to injury. Rarely did children wear protective equipment, increasing their risk to injury from trauma, which could precipitate a sickling event. Parents need increased anticipatory guidance concerning normal activities of childhood.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInjury Risk Behaviors in Children with Sick Cell Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLobo, Marieen_US
dc.author.detailsMarie Lobo, PhD, Assistant Professor, Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, email: lobom1@musc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166176-
dc.description.abstractSickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common hereditary hematological disorder in humans. Based on their illness state children with SCD have many risks for impaired growth and development. Few studies have been done which address family or normal child development issues in African American families, much less in families with a child with SCD. Even less is known about the everyday normal childhood activities in which children with SCD participate. Children with SCD are more vulnerable to complications if they experience injury. This study had two aims: 1) to describe family functioning in families with a child with SCD and 2) to describe injury risk taking behaviors in children with SCD. This report will focus on injury risk behaviors and those protective actions taken by the family or child. Families were recruited from the pediatric sickle cell clinic in a major children's hospital in the Southeastern US. Most children were at clinic for routine monitoring. This sample includes the oldest child with SCD in 121 families. The majority of the respondents to the surveys were mothers. The average age of the child was 6.55 years (sd = 5.1; range 1 month to 17 years), 56.2% had Hemiglobin SS disease. Because of mandatory younger infants are being seen in the clinic for early preventive treatment. Average grade of those attending school is 4.9 (sd = 3.2) with only 68% in the appropriate grade level for age. 86 of the children had at least one hospitalization for an SCD event. Many of the children participated in age appropriate play activities, however few injury protection actions were initiated. 86% of the caregivers reported they lived in safe or very safe neighborhoods. The majority of the children lived in the suburbs or rural area, with only 19% living in urban areas. Thus, this sample lives in very different environments than most children with SCD who have been studied; with most published studies from metropolitan urban environments. While 58 of the children had bicycles only 11 had helmets which 5 of them never wore and oniy 1 child wore 100% of the time. Seven of the children had skateboards, 3 used protective equipment, only 1 child 100% of the time. 22 children swam, with 2 children never swimming where a life guard was present. Eighteen children played organized sports such as football, baseball, and basketball. Children with SCD participated in many activities which made them vulnerable to injury. Rarely did children wear protective equipment, increasing their risk to injury from trauma, which could precipitate a sickling event. Parents need increased anticipatory guidance concerning normal activities of childhood.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:47Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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