Determinants of motivation in regular physical exercise: A test of the wellness motivation nursing theory in older African Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166179
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of motivation in regular physical exercise: A test of the wellness motivation nursing theory in older African Americans
Author(s):
Fleury, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Fleury, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jfleury@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefit of habitual physical activity in unproving health, reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease, and increasing longevity and quality of life. Continued physical activity offers tangible benefits to physically capable older adults, primarily in reducing the risk of physical impairment and mortality. Understanding motivation to initiate and sustain health behavior change is an essential step in developing a lasting program of regular physical activity in those at highest risk for chronic illness. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify motivational predictors of the initiation and maintenance of regular physical activity in older African Americans. The study serves as a test of a motivation theory and provides a basis for understanding health issues and cultural preferences of minority persons at risk for chronic illness. The pilot study had two phases. In phase I of the study, community-based focus groups were convened to determine the cultural meaning and relevance of motivational concepts as well as plans for subject recruitment and pilot study protocol. Sections from data collection instruments were reviewed to ensure readability, comprehension and relevance to intended participants. Based on the responses of the focus groups, standardized interview schedules and response formats were developed to facilitate data collection with a sample of elderly African Americans. In phase II of data collection, one hundred African American men and women over the age of 60 were recruited from Community Action programs in rural North Carolina. Subjects were recruited to evaluate motivational determinants of regular physical activity so as to provide a cross sectional evaluation of predictors of physical activity. Subjects completed an interview schedule at one point in time which included measures of cultural context, appraisal of readiness to initiate physical activity, self-regulation in the maintenance of physical activity, and patterns of physical activity. Both phases in the data collection were completed by May, 1995. This presentation will focus on describing which variables in a model of wellness motivation are significant predictors of regular physical activity in older African Americans. The goals are to augment knowledge of effective, feasible and acceptable strategies to maintain the cardiovascular health of older adults and prevent chronic illness through regular physical activity; and to lay the groundwork for further theory specification and testing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of motivation in regular physical exercise: A test of the wellness motivation nursing theory in older African Americansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFleury, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Fleury, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jfleury@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166179-
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have demonstrated the benefit of habitual physical activity in unproving health, reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease, and increasing longevity and quality of life. Continued physical activity offers tangible benefits to physically capable older adults, primarily in reducing the risk of physical impairment and mortality. Understanding motivation to initiate and sustain health behavior change is an essential step in developing a lasting program of regular physical activity in those at highest risk for chronic illness. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify motivational predictors of the initiation and maintenance of regular physical activity in older African Americans. The study serves as a test of a motivation theory and provides a basis for understanding health issues and cultural preferences of minority persons at risk for chronic illness. The pilot study had two phases. In phase I of the study, community-based focus groups were convened to determine the cultural meaning and relevance of motivational concepts as well as plans for subject recruitment and pilot study protocol. Sections from data collection instruments were reviewed to ensure readability, comprehension and relevance to intended participants. Based on the responses of the focus groups, standardized interview schedules and response formats were developed to facilitate data collection with a sample of elderly African Americans. In phase II of data collection, one hundred African American men and women over the age of 60 were recruited from Community Action programs in rural North Carolina. Subjects were recruited to evaluate motivational determinants of regular physical activity so as to provide a cross sectional evaluation of predictors of physical activity. Subjects completed an interview schedule at one point in time which included measures of cultural context, appraisal of readiness to initiate physical activity, self-regulation in the maintenance of physical activity, and patterns of physical activity. Both phases in the data collection were completed by May, 1995. This presentation will focus on describing which variables in a model of wellness motivation are significant predictors of regular physical activity in older African Americans. The goals are to augment knowledge of effective, feasible and acceptable strategies to maintain the cardiovascular health of older adults and prevent chronic illness through regular physical activity; and to lay the groundwork for further theory specification and testing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:51Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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