2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166180
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A nursing support intervention with mothers of preterm infants
Author(s):
Holditch-Davis, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Holditch-Davis, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: diane_hd@unc.edu
Abstract:
Premature infants are at risk for alter chronic health and developmental problems. Effective health and early intervention programs are available, but mothers of prematures do not consistently use these services because of unresolved issues from their infants' NICU stay and family problems. The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the feasibility of an intervention providing support to these mothers after hospital discharge. This intervention is designed to supplement existing well-child and developmental services by providing parental support that is usually not part of these services. Four specific research questions will be addressed: 1) the feasibility of the intervention, 2) the effect of the intervention on the use of services, maternal psychological well-being, and quality of the social environment, 3) developmental outcome of the infants. Two hundred mothers and their high-risk premature infants (40 in the pilot study) will be recruited shortly before discharge and followed until the infants are 24 months post-term. The mothers will be randomly assigned to control and intervention groups. The intervention will consist of an initial in-person contact in the hospital followed by 2 home visits and monthly telephone contacts until 18-month past-term. Each contact will be guided by a semi-structured protocol and will be documented by intervener using field notes. House's (1981) four types of support will be provided at each contact. Each subject's intervention contacts will be with a single intervention nurse. Services used will be measured using the Infant and Family Services Survey and an immunization record. Maternal psychological well-being will be measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Stress Support Scale, and three measures of the mother's perception of the stress associated with parenting her infant. The quality of the infant's social environment will be measured using a 1-hour naturalistic observation of mother-infant interaction and the HOME Inventory at 2, 6, and 18 months, infant-developmental outcome will measured with the Bayley II and Preschool Language Scales - Third version the infant is 12 and 24 months post-term.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA nursing support intervention with mothers of preterm infantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHolditch-Davis, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Holditch-Davis, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: diane_hd@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166180-
dc.description.abstractPremature infants are at risk for alter chronic health and developmental problems. Effective health and early intervention programs are available, but mothers of prematures do not consistently use these services because of unresolved issues from their infants' NICU stay and family problems. The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the feasibility of an intervention providing support to these mothers after hospital discharge. This intervention is designed to supplement existing well-child and developmental services by providing parental support that is usually not part of these services. Four specific research questions will be addressed: 1) the feasibility of the intervention, 2) the effect of the intervention on the use of services, maternal psychological well-being, and quality of the social environment, 3) developmental outcome of the infants. Two hundred mothers and their high-risk premature infants (40 in the pilot study) will be recruited shortly before discharge and followed until the infants are 24 months post-term. The mothers will be randomly assigned to control and intervention groups. The intervention will consist of an initial in-person contact in the hospital followed by 2 home visits and monthly telephone contacts until 18-month past-term. Each contact will be guided by a semi-structured protocol and will be documented by intervener using field notes. House's (1981) four types of support will be provided at each contact. Each subject's intervention contacts will be with a single intervention nurse. Services used will be measured using the Infant and Family Services Survey and an immunization record. Maternal psychological well-being will be measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Stress Support Scale, and three measures of the mother's perception of the stress associated with parenting her infant. The quality of the infant's social environment will be measured using a 1-hour naturalistic observation of mother-infant interaction and the HOME Inventory at 2, 6, and 18 months, infant-developmental outcome will measured with the Bayley II and Preschool Language Scales - Third version the infant is 12 and 24 months post-term.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:53Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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