A Comparison of Cultural Competence and Cultural Confidence of Senior NursingStudents at a Private Southern University

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166184
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Cultural Competence and Cultural Confidence of Senior NursingStudents at a Private Southern University
Author(s):
Zoucha, Rick
Author Details:
Rick Zoucha, MS/MSc, Duquesne University, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zoucha@duq.edu
Abstract:
The American Society is becoming increasingly diverse and multi-cultural. Nurses must recognize the impact this has on our profession, our educational preparation and our ability to provide quality care. Nursing education has recognized the need to incorporate in its programs courses which survey different cultures, teach cultural assessment, which assist students to explore and understand their feelings and value for cultural diversity. The specific aim and purpose for this study was to compare the self reported cultural competence and cultural confidence of senior nursing students who had received class content on culture sensitive nursing with a senior class who had not received any cultural content. The stated hypothesis for this study is: Are there differences in self reported cultural competence and cultural confidence of senior nursing students who have received class content on culture sensitive nursing and those senior nursing students who have not received in class culture sensitive nursing? The subjects in this study consisted of (N=32) senior nursing students who received class content on culture sensitive nursing and (N=31) senior nursing students who have not received class content on culture sensitive nursing. The Bernal and Froman Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure cultural competence and confidence in this sample. The tool was administered to senior nursing students during one semester who have received cultural sensitive content and in another semester to senior nursing students who have not received cultural sensitive content in class. Data analysis included measures of central tendency and dispersion, and t-test of significance were utilized. Findings suggest overall, students who have received some course content on culturally-sensitive nursing feel less competent and less confident to provide culturally sensitive care than those who received no course content on the subject. The integration of multi-culturalism into the nursing curriculum and the findings of this study will be presented and discussed. Implications for this study include: enhanced cultural curriculum, continued faculty and student assessment of cultural competence and cultural confidence, and establishment of a culturally friendly practice and learning environment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Cultural Competence and Cultural Confidence of Senior NursingStudents at a Private Southern Universityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZoucha, Ricken_US
dc.author.detailsRick Zoucha, MS/MSc, Duquesne University, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zoucha@duq.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166184-
dc.description.abstractThe American Society is becoming increasingly diverse and multi-cultural. Nurses must recognize the impact this has on our profession, our educational preparation and our ability to provide quality care. Nursing education has recognized the need to incorporate in its programs courses which survey different cultures, teach cultural assessment, which assist students to explore and understand their feelings and value for cultural diversity. The specific aim and purpose for this study was to compare the self reported cultural competence and cultural confidence of senior nursing students who had received class content on culture sensitive nursing with a senior class who had not received any cultural content. The stated hypothesis for this study is: Are there differences in self reported cultural competence and cultural confidence of senior nursing students who have received class content on culture sensitive nursing and those senior nursing students who have not received in class culture sensitive nursing? The subjects in this study consisted of (N=32) senior nursing students who received class content on culture sensitive nursing and (N=31) senior nursing students who have not received class content on culture sensitive nursing. The Bernal and Froman Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure cultural competence and confidence in this sample. The tool was administered to senior nursing students during one semester who have received cultural sensitive content and in another semester to senior nursing students who have not received cultural sensitive content in class. Data analysis included measures of central tendency and dispersion, and t-test of significance were utilized. Findings suggest overall, students who have received some course content on culturally-sensitive nursing feel less competent and less confident to provide culturally sensitive care than those who received no course content on the subject. The integration of multi-culturalism into the nursing curriculum and the findings of this study will be presented and discussed. Implications for this study include: enhanced cultural curriculum, continued faculty and student assessment of cultural competence and cultural confidence, and establishment of a culturally friendly practice and learning environment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:58Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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