2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166185
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting University-Based AIDS Education Efforts and Outcomes
Author(s):
Boyd, Therese
Author Details:
Therese Boyd, Florida International University, Student Health Center, North Miami, Florida, USA, email: Therese.Boyd@fiu.edu
Abstract:
Florida's state universities, in response to legislative mandates and concerns for college students, have launched a variety of AIDS education initiatives. However, the intended outcomes or changes in students' knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behavior is difficult to determine. This problem was addressed by investigating the efforts and outcomes of AIDS educational initiatives at a South Florida state university, while uncovering the factors that contribute to these outcomes. A conceptual framework provided a visual model of factors that mediate the processes and/or outcomes experienced by the student in response to an AIDS educational effort. These factors are generally categorized as institutional mediators and individual mediators sharing subcategories of: people; circumstances; beliefs; and actions. Individual mediators also included endemic traits of the student. A qualitative methodology was adopted for flexibility and discovery of variables affecting efforts and outcomes. The study's five phase data collection process encompassed: 1) interviews with administrative and student leadership; 2) surveys of 804 undergraduate students; 3) in-depth interview with 22 students; 4) review of student interview transcripts by a panel of experts; and 5) extensive analyses of all data. Findings indicated that students predominately receive AIDS information from impersonal mass media sources. In contrast to national studies, students at this University lacked proficiency (score of 80% correct or higher) in overall AIDS knowledge, particularly HIV prevention. Statistically significant relationships existed between level of knowledge, particularly HIV prevention. Statistically significant relationships existed between level of knowledge; condom use; and positive attitudes towards people with AIDS. Students wanted more information on HIV prevention, distributed by a variety of methods. While this study found that students were becoming more knowledgeable, changing attitudes, and testing-out safer sexual behavior; it revealed a need for additional HIV prevention education, administrative support for programming, creative marketing strategies, varied methods for HIV prevention education, and promotion and support for sexual behavior change. The findings of this study are of particular importance to nursing students not only from a personal but a professional standpoint since nursing students are often queried by clients and peers about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention. Specific recommendations include: garnering the support of academic leadership; utilizing effective marketing strategies; expanding the peer education program; and integrating HIV prevention messages throughout the core curriculum.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting University-Based AIDS Education Efforts and Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Thereseen_US
dc.author.detailsTherese Boyd, Florida International University, Student Health Center, North Miami, Florida, USA, email: Therese.Boyd@fiu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166185-
dc.description.abstractFlorida's state universities, in response to legislative mandates and concerns for college students, have launched a variety of AIDS education initiatives. However, the intended outcomes or changes in students' knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behavior is difficult to determine. This problem was addressed by investigating the efforts and outcomes of AIDS educational initiatives at a South Florida state university, while uncovering the factors that contribute to these outcomes. A conceptual framework provided a visual model of factors that mediate the processes and/or outcomes experienced by the student in response to an AIDS educational effort. These factors are generally categorized as institutional mediators and individual mediators sharing subcategories of: people; circumstances; beliefs; and actions. Individual mediators also included endemic traits of the student. A qualitative methodology was adopted for flexibility and discovery of variables affecting efforts and outcomes. The study's five phase data collection process encompassed: 1) interviews with administrative and student leadership; 2) surveys of 804 undergraduate students; 3) in-depth interview with 22 students; 4) review of student interview transcripts by a panel of experts; and 5) extensive analyses of all data. Findings indicated that students predominately receive AIDS information from impersonal mass media sources. In contrast to national studies, students at this University lacked proficiency (score of 80% correct or higher) in overall AIDS knowledge, particularly HIV prevention. Statistically significant relationships existed between level of knowledge, particularly HIV prevention. Statistically significant relationships existed between level of knowledge; condom use; and positive attitudes towards people with AIDS. Students wanted more information on HIV prevention, distributed by a variety of methods. While this study found that students were becoming more knowledgeable, changing attitudes, and testing-out safer sexual behavior; it revealed a need for additional HIV prevention education, administrative support for programming, creative marketing strategies, varied methods for HIV prevention education, and promotion and support for sexual behavior change. The findings of this study are of particular importance to nursing students not only from a personal but a professional standpoint since nursing students are often queried by clients and peers about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention. Specific recommendations include: garnering the support of academic leadership; utilizing effective marketing strategies; expanding the peer education program; and integrating HIV prevention messages throughout the core curriculum.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:41:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:41:59Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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