2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166187
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Functional Status 3 Months After Heart Transplantation
Author(s):
White-Williams, Connie; Binns-Tumer, Pam; Fazekas, Susan
Author Details:
Connie White-Williams, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA (updated February 2015) email: cwwilli@uabmc.edu; Pam Binns-Tumer; Susan Fazekas
Abstract:
Functional status is an important outcome measure after heart transplantation (HT). Predictors of functional status were examined in 190 patients who were 3 months post HT at the University of Alabama Medical Center at Birmingham and Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center. Patients were 80% male, 87% white, 81% married, mean age = 53 years, 90% NYHA I and 14% working. Data were collected using the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), Rating Form, Jalowiec Coping Scale, Heart Transplant Symptom Checklist, Compliance with Heart Transplant Regimen, Social Support Index, HT Intervention Scale and Chart Review Form. The areas of greatest functional disability were work (95.8%) and eating (87.4%). Stepwise multiple regression demonstrated 6/19 variables as predictors of better functional ability 3 months after HT which explained 51.4% of the variance (F=34.35, p=.0000). The predictors were less symptom distress, fewer infections and complications in the last 2 months, better ability to cope with the HT, less difficulty handling the HT regimen and shorter length of hospital stay for the HT. Identification of these predictors and areas of greatest disability allow health care providers to target problematic areas and intervene to achieve optimal functional status after heart transplantation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Functional Status 3 Months After Heart Transplantationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite-Williams, Connieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBinns-Tumer, Pamen_US
dc.contributor.authorFazekas, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsConnie White-Williams, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA (updated February 2015) email: cwwilli@uabmc.edu; Pam Binns-Tumer; Susan Fazekasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166187-
dc.description.abstractFunctional status is an important outcome measure after heart transplantation (HT). Predictors of functional status were examined in 190 patients who were 3 months post HT at the University of Alabama Medical Center at Birmingham and Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center. Patients were 80% male, 87% white, 81% married, mean age = 53 years, 90% NYHA I and 14% working. Data were collected using the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), Rating Form, Jalowiec Coping Scale, Heart Transplant Symptom Checklist, Compliance with Heart Transplant Regimen, Social Support Index, HT Intervention Scale and Chart Review Form. The areas of greatest functional disability were work (95.8%) and eating (87.4%). Stepwise multiple regression demonstrated 6/19 variables as predictors of better functional ability 3 months after HT which explained 51.4% of the variance (F=34.35, p=.0000). The predictors were less symptom distress, fewer infections and complications in the last 2 months, better ability to cope with the HT, less difficulty handling the HT regimen and shorter length of hospital stay for the HT. Identification of these predictors and areas of greatest disability allow health care providers to target problematic areas and intervene to achieve optimal functional status after heart transplantation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:02Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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