2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166190
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living With Chronic Illness: A Study of Gender Differences
Author(s):
Dowdy, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon Dowdy, Belmont University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: dowdys@belmont.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine gender differences of persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in three specific areas: strategies to cope with pain, adjustment to a chronic illness, and social support. The study of gender differences in chronic illness is important because these are rarely examined and because chronic illness affects such a large percentage of the adult population. Subjects for the present study are part of a large, federally-funded grant studying the behavioral aspects of rheumatoid artritis. Data collection for the large study (N=208) consists of mailed questionnaires, telephone interviews, and home visits. Data collection for this study is based on the second telephone interview for a subset of twenty subjects, ten men and ten women. All subjects were diagnosed by a rheumatologist with definite or classical RA within five years of the interview, and none have concurrent rheumatic disease or psychiatric disorder. Ages range from 39 to 76, with a mean age of 58.5. Fifteen are married, four are widowed, and one is single. Fourteen open-ended questions in the telephone interview were analyzed using primarily the method of analytic induction. Interviews ranged from 30 minutes to 80 minutes, with a mean length of 50 minutes. Pain coping strategies and adjustment were similar for men and women, whereas some important differences were found in social support for men and women. Pain coping strategies were categorized as cognitive and physical, with men and women using similar percentages of each. Women, however, mentioned more strategies than men. Men slowed down or stopped the activity that was affecting the pain more often, while women wanted to actively do something to relieve the pain or just rest. Adjustment also showed similar patterns for men and women. Both learned to live with RA by searching for a person-environment fit. Either the environment was adjusted to the person (25% and 23% for women and men, respectively) or the person to the environment (75% and 77% for women and men, respectively). Men and women mentioned instrumental support equally as often, but women mentioned informational support three times as often as men. Emotioual support was importat for men and women, but they looked for their emotional support from different sources. Men depended on their spouse and family for emotional support, while women depended on friends and family. Both mentioned the negative aspects of social support. In summary, men and women discuss similar patterns of coping with pain and adjusting to a chronic illness. Both men and women underscore the need for social support, but seek support in different amounts and from different sources. Studying patterns of adjustment, coping, and social support for men and women may help in developing differential interventions to help achieve positive health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving With Chronic Illness: A Study of Gender Differencesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDowdy, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon Dowdy, Belmont University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: dowdys@belmont.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166190-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this qualitative study was to examine gender differences of persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in three specific areas: strategies to cope with pain, adjustment to a chronic illness, and social support. The study of gender differences in chronic illness is important because these are rarely examined and because chronic illness affects such a large percentage of the adult population. Subjects for the present study are part of a large, federally-funded grant studying the behavioral aspects of rheumatoid artritis. Data collection for the large study (N=208) consists of mailed questionnaires, telephone interviews, and home visits. Data collection for this study is based on the second telephone interview for a subset of twenty subjects, ten men and ten women. All subjects were diagnosed by a rheumatologist with definite or classical RA within five years of the interview, and none have concurrent rheumatic disease or psychiatric disorder. Ages range from 39 to 76, with a mean age of 58.5. Fifteen are married, four are widowed, and one is single. Fourteen open-ended questions in the telephone interview were analyzed using primarily the method of analytic induction. Interviews ranged from 30 minutes to 80 minutes, with a mean length of 50 minutes. Pain coping strategies and adjustment were similar for men and women, whereas some important differences were found in social support for men and women. Pain coping strategies were categorized as cognitive and physical, with men and women using similar percentages of each. Women, however, mentioned more strategies than men. Men slowed down or stopped the activity that was affecting the pain more often, while women wanted to actively do something to relieve the pain or just rest. Adjustment also showed similar patterns for men and women. Both learned to live with RA by searching for a person-environment fit. Either the environment was adjusted to the person (25% and 23% for women and men, respectively) or the person to the environment (75% and 77% for women and men, respectively). Men and women mentioned instrumental support equally as often, but women mentioned informational support three times as often as men. Emotioual support was importat for men and women, but they looked for their emotional support from different sources. Men depended on their spouse and family for emotional support, while women depended on friends and family. Both mentioned the negative aspects of social support. In summary, men and women discuss similar patterns of coping with pain and adjusting to a chronic illness. Both men and women underscore the need for social support, but seek support in different amounts and from different sources. Studying patterns of adjustment, coping, and social support for men and women may help in developing differential interventions to help achieve positive health outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:05Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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