2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166191
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers' Views of Their Children's Growth
Author(s):
Reifsnider, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: reifsnider@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the explanatory models of child growth and health held by mothers of children with growth failure. This study represents the second phase in an expansion of the investigator's dissertation research on the treatment of growth failure by community health nursing interventions. The interventions provided during the dissertation study were assoiated with a reduction in growth failure and an improvement in mother-child interactions. The mothers were interviewed during the original study on their perceptions of their children's growth, health and size. The creation of explanatory models of child growth and health may allow us to understand the development of growth failure in children, and provide enhanced health services to those children at-risk of growth failure. Specifically, the study explored the mothers' views of a healthy child, the impact of a child's diet on growth and health, and activities they identify that encourage the growth and health of their children. The research question was "What are the explanatory models of health and growth held by mothers of growth-delayed children?" An ethnographic design using intensive interviewing was employed. The sample consists of 39 mothers of growth-delayed children who were in the researcher's original study. The data analyzed consisted of semi-structured interviews conducted during the original research. A qualitative approach was used to provide a framework for the secondary analysis. Using ethnographic methods, the researcher inductively analyzed the themes and domains identified by the sample to create an explanatory model (Kleinman, 1980) of child growth for this population. The interview guide used during the original study constitutes the instrument. The guide was utilized to identify the parent's perception of his/her child's growth and overall health. All interviews were tape-recorded. Qualitative data obtained from the original interviews was transcribed and analyzed using a code book developed by the researcher based on semantic domain, theme and pattern analysis (Spradley, 1979). Relevant demographic data and quantitative measures from the dissertation research was used to situate the study in a larger context. The mothers of the growth-delayed children primarily identified genetics as the reason for their children's small size. This attribution persisted at the end of the study even though the mothers had seen their children grow at an accelerated rate during the intervention phase (four months). Mothers did not link their children's dietary intake with their size. The mothers wanted better environments for their children and identified poor neighborhoods and lack of safe play areas as impacting on their children's health. This research addresses the outcomes of child growth and health and focuses on the delivery of primary nursing care in the community and provides ideas for improving children's health and growth.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers' Views of Their Children's Growthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReifsnider, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: reifsnider@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166191-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the explanatory models of child growth and health held by mothers of children with growth failure. This study represents the second phase in an expansion of the investigator's dissertation research on the treatment of growth failure by community health nursing interventions. The interventions provided during the dissertation study were assoiated with a reduction in growth failure and an improvement in mother-child interactions. The mothers were interviewed during the original study on their perceptions of their children's growth, health and size. The creation of explanatory models of child growth and health may allow us to understand the development of growth failure in children, and provide enhanced health services to those children at-risk of growth failure. Specifically, the study explored the mothers' views of a healthy child, the impact of a child's diet on growth and health, and activities they identify that encourage the growth and health of their children. The research question was "What are the explanatory models of health and growth held by mothers of growth-delayed children?" An ethnographic design using intensive interviewing was employed. The sample consists of 39 mothers of growth-delayed children who were in the researcher's original study. The data analyzed consisted of semi-structured interviews conducted during the original research. A qualitative approach was used to provide a framework for the secondary analysis. Using ethnographic methods, the researcher inductively analyzed the themes and domains identified by the sample to create an explanatory model (Kleinman, 1980) of child growth for this population. The interview guide used during the original study constitutes the instrument. The guide was utilized to identify the parent's perception of his/her child's growth and overall health. All interviews were tape-recorded. Qualitative data obtained from the original interviews was transcribed and analyzed using a code book developed by the researcher based on semantic domain, theme and pattern analysis (Spradley, 1979). Relevant demographic data and quantitative measures from the dissertation research was used to situate the study in a larger context. The mothers of the growth-delayed children primarily identified genetics as the reason for their children's small size. This attribution persisted at the end of the study even though the mothers had seen their children grow at an accelerated rate during the intervention phase (four months). Mothers did not link their children's dietary intake with their size. The mothers wanted better environments for their children and identified poor neighborhoods and lack of safe play areas as impacting on their children's health. This research addresses the outcomes of child growth and health and focuses on the delivery of primary nursing care in the community and provides ideas for improving children's health and growth.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:06Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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