2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166193
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers in prison: Maintaining parental role (DISS)
Author(s):
Thompson, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Thompson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: patricia@stti.org
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The aims of this study were to better understand 1) the impact of incarceration on mothers and their children and 2) strategies that enhance parental role enactment during a mother's incarceration. As the 1990's began, the number of women in prison in the United States tripled to over 40,500. Two thirds of these are mothers of children under eighteen and 80% lived with them before prison. The prison environment has a negative impact on parenting. Mothers and children are separated, children must be cared for, and their mother's absence explained. Caretakers may not be able to care for the children appropriately, visits may be infrequent, and families must cope with related issues, such as substance abuse. A Parenting from Prison (PFP) program could help maintain the link between these mothers and their children. This research, based on a synthesis of symbolic interactionist role concepts, parental role components, and learning theory, measured the outcomes of teh PFP program for mothers in the Women's Unit at Tucker, Arkansas, and their children. Research questions: 1. Is there a difference in parenting attitudes between incarcerated mothers who participate in the PFP program and those who do not, as indicated by post-intervention scores adjusted for pre-intervention status on the Adult Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI) (Bavolek, 1989) and Index of Self Esteem (ISE) (Hudson, 1982)? 2. What is the status and experience of teh children of incarcerated women, as reported by the children and their caregivers? Subjects: Question #1: PFP participants were 60 incarcerated adult mothers, selected into either an intervention group or a delayed intervention group. Question #2: Forty-eight children (ages 4 to 19 yrs) of 25 incarcerated mothers and their caregivers comprised the interview sample. Methods: Question #1: Using a two-group repeated measures design, measures were administered to 60 women before and after the program of 15-weekly sessions of teh Nurturing Program for Parents (Bavolek & Comstock, 1985) and to a delayed intervention comparison group at those same times. Measures included semi-structured questionnaires, the AAPI, and the ISE. Data collection is complete. Group differences and interaction on the AAPI and ISE are currently being analyzed by a 2-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using pretest scores as the covariate and intervention/no intervention and any type of abuse (drug, alcohol, emotional, physical, sexual) reported by mothers as factors. Question #2: Qualitative data collected through personal interviews with the caregivers and the children is undergoing content analysis using constant comparative techniques and calculation of frequencies. Findings: Preliminary results indicate significant increases in pre-to-post scores on the AAPI and ISE and improved mother-child communication as a result of particiaption in the PFP program, as was found in previous studies. Most children's caregivers were their grandparents; the remainder were their fathers or other relatives. Caregivers and children described the children's school experiences, living situation, knowledge of mother's situation, response to separation from mother and siblings and to visiting the prison, and to perceived differences in mother-child relationships. Implications: Parent education in the prison can help to maintain parent-child relationships. Children of incarcerated mothers and their caregivers have special needs for services to maintain physical and emotional health. Data from this study will be useful to nurses who provide teaching, counseling, emotional support, and referrals to mothers in or recently released from prison and/or to their family members.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers in prison: Maintaining parental role (DISS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Thompson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: patricia@stti.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166193-
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The aims of this study were to better understand 1) the impact of incarceration on mothers and their children and 2) strategies that enhance parental role enactment during a mother's incarceration. As the 1990's began, the number of women in prison in the United States tripled to over 40,500. Two thirds of these are mothers of children under eighteen and 80% lived with them before prison. The prison environment has a negative impact on parenting. Mothers and children are separated, children must be cared for, and their mother's absence explained. Caretakers may not be able to care for the children appropriately, visits may be infrequent, and families must cope with related issues, such as substance abuse. A Parenting from Prison (PFP) program could help maintain the link between these mothers and their children. This research, based on a synthesis of symbolic interactionist role concepts, parental role components, and learning theory, measured the outcomes of teh PFP program for mothers in the Women's Unit at Tucker, Arkansas, and their children. Research questions: 1. Is there a difference in parenting attitudes between incarcerated mothers who participate in the PFP program and those who do not, as indicated by post-intervention scores adjusted for pre-intervention status on the Adult Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI) (Bavolek, 1989) and Index of Self Esteem (ISE) (Hudson, 1982)? 2. What is the status and experience of teh children of incarcerated women, as reported by the children and their caregivers? Subjects: Question #1: PFP participants were 60 incarcerated adult mothers, selected into either an intervention group or a delayed intervention group. Question #2: Forty-eight children (ages 4 to 19 yrs) of 25 incarcerated mothers and their caregivers comprised the interview sample. Methods: Question #1: Using a two-group repeated measures design, measures were administered to 60 women before and after the program of 15-weekly sessions of teh Nurturing Program for Parents (Bavolek & Comstock, 1985) and to a delayed intervention comparison group at those same times. Measures included semi-structured questionnaires, the AAPI, and the ISE. Data collection is complete. Group differences and interaction on the AAPI and ISE are currently being analyzed by a 2-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using pretest scores as the covariate and intervention/no intervention and any type of abuse (drug, alcohol, emotional, physical, sexual) reported by mothers as factors. Question #2: Qualitative data collected through personal interviews with the caregivers and the children is undergoing content analysis using constant comparative techniques and calculation of frequencies. Findings: Preliminary results indicate significant increases in pre-to-post scores on the AAPI and ISE and improved mother-child communication as a result of particiaption in the PFP program, as was found in previous studies. Most children's caregivers were their grandparents; the remainder were their fathers or other relatives. Caregivers and children described the children's school experiences, living situation, knowledge of mother's situation, response to separation from mother and siblings and to visiting the prison, and to perceived differences in mother-child relationships. Implications: Parent education in the prison can help to maintain parent-child relationships. Children of incarcerated mothers and their caregivers have special needs for services to maintain physical and emotional health. Data from this study will be useful to nurses who provide teaching, counseling, emotional support, and referrals to mothers in or recently released from prison and/or to their family members.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:09Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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