Benefits of a coordinated system of community-based health care services for medically underserved children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166194
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Benefits of a coordinated system of community-based health care services for medically underserved children
Author(s):
Hayes, Jill
Author Details:
Jill Hayes, PhD, North Georgia College & State University Department of Nursing, Dahlonega, Georgia, USA, email: jhayes@nugget.ngc.peachnet.edu
Abstract:
Access to health promotional services for children in the United States (U.S.) has become an issue of critical importance. Fifty percent of the U.S. youth of today are at risk for drug and alcohol abuse, STD's, pregnancy, and injury or death from violence or accident. These health related risks often lead to an increase in school absenteeism and poor academic performance. The purpose of this study was the measurement of the benefits of improved access to health care for Medicaid-eligible children. The academic and medical records of 143 children enrolled in an innovative program providing comprehensive health care services to Medicaid-eligible children were reviewed. Demographic data were analyzed to identify any significant characteristics of study participants. Data on utilization of health services, absenteeism, overall health status, and academic performance were analyzed to determine if this population would benefit from improved access to health-care services. There was a significant increase in the use of wellness and illness services by participants. There was also a significant increase in the absenteeism rate of participants between Time 1 and 2, and Time 1 and 3. It was anticipated that absenteeism would decline as utilization increased. However, as participant utilization of services increased, absenteeism also increased. It was anticipated that academic performance would improve as utilization of health care services increased. However, academic performance declined as utilization increased. Finally there was a significant change in the health status scores of participants between Time 2 and 3. In addition, any possible correlation between utilization of services and absenteeism, and utilization of services and academic performance, were explored. Findings of this study represent significant changes in this population relative to the variables studied. Both utilization of services and health status improved following one year of enrollment in the Alliance. Absenteeism and academic performance declined for the same time period. Possible rationale for these findings and potential implications are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBenefits of a coordinated system of community-based health care services for medically underserved childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsJill Hayes, PhD, North Georgia College & State University Department of Nursing, Dahlonega, Georgia, USA, email: jhayes@nugget.ngc.peachnet.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166194-
dc.description.abstractAccess to health promotional services for children in the United States (U.S.) has become an issue of critical importance. Fifty percent of the U.S. youth of today are at risk for drug and alcohol abuse, STD's, pregnancy, and injury or death from violence or accident. These health related risks often lead to an increase in school absenteeism and poor academic performance. The purpose of this study was the measurement of the benefits of improved access to health care for Medicaid-eligible children. The academic and medical records of 143 children enrolled in an innovative program providing comprehensive health care services to Medicaid-eligible children were reviewed. Demographic data were analyzed to identify any significant characteristics of study participants. Data on utilization of health services, absenteeism, overall health status, and academic performance were analyzed to determine if this population would benefit from improved access to health-care services. There was a significant increase in the use of wellness and illness services by participants. There was also a significant increase in the absenteeism rate of participants between Time 1 and 2, and Time 1 and 3. It was anticipated that absenteeism would decline as utilization increased. However, as participant utilization of services increased, absenteeism also increased. It was anticipated that academic performance would improve as utilization of health care services increased. However, academic performance declined as utilization increased. Finally there was a significant change in the health status scores of participants between Time 2 and 3. In addition, any possible correlation between utilization of services and absenteeism, and utilization of services and academic performance, were explored. Findings of this study represent significant changes in this population relative to the variables studied. Both utilization of services and health status improved following one year of enrollment in the Alliance. Absenteeism and academic performance declined for the same time period. Possible rationale for these findings and potential implications are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:10Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.