2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166195
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Instrument Development: To Do or Not To Do
Author(s):
Gueldner, Sarah Hall
Author Details:
Sarah Gueldner, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University, Health and Human Development East, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: shg9@pau.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is first to broadly discuss aspects of instrument development and second, to apply the different steps to an instrument on which I am currently working, the Index of Field Energy. The Index is a 17-item of well-being developed within the Rogerian Science of Unitary Human Being. Four essential issues involved in instrument development will be presented. The first issue is determining the need for developing a new instrument as opposed to using or refining one that is already available. The second issue surrounds constructing a new scale and defining and analyzing the inherent concepts and subconcepts. Discussion on the use of experts and focus groups as ways to accomplish this will be included. The third issue concerns the psychometric properties important to the developing instrument. The number of items, item format, scale readability and clarity, scoring, length, and selecting appropriate tests for validity and reliability will be discussed. The fourth and last issue concerns piloting and revising the instrument. The Index of Field Energy is a 17-item scale of well-being developed within the Rogerian Science of Unitary Human Beings. Initially, 75 potential items were generated. These were subsequently reviewed by a panel of nine Rogerian scholars to assure content validity; 40 items remained following this review. These eventually evolved into 17 items, each of which consists of a bipolar pair of pictures (i.e., a turtle at one end and a butterfly at the other) in a 7 point Likert scale format. The psychometric properties of the instrument were established through two sequential samples of 300 college students followed by 325 individuals of varying ages. The latter included 60 persons over the age of 65. The scale was designed both for people with limited formal education and for whom English is not the primary language. A game board format has recently been developed that allows hand placement instead of a paper and pencil response. This format is especially appropriate for children and older people. Test anxiety is reduced and people with limited mobility can respond.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInstrument Development: To Do or Not To Doen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGueldner, Sarah Hallen_US
dc.author.detailsSarah Gueldner, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University, Health and Human Development East, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: shg9@pau.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166195-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is first to broadly discuss aspects of instrument development and second, to apply the different steps to an instrument on which I am currently working, the Index of Field Energy. The Index is a 17-item of well-being developed within the Rogerian Science of Unitary Human Being. Four essential issues involved in instrument development will be presented. The first issue is determining the need for developing a new instrument as opposed to using or refining one that is already available. The second issue surrounds constructing a new scale and defining and analyzing the inherent concepts and subconcepts. Discussion on the use of experts and focus groups as ways to accomplish this will be included. The third issue concerns the psychometric properties important to the developing instrument. The number of items, item format, scale readability and clarity, scoring, length, and selecting appropriate tests for validity and reliability will be discussed. The fourth and last issue concerns piloting and revising the instrument. The Index of Field Energy is a 17-item scale of well-being developed within the Rogerian Science of Unitary Human Beings. Initially, 75 potential items were generated. These were subsequently reviewed by a panel of nine Rogerian scholars to assure content validity; 40 items remained following this review. These eventually evolved into 17 items, each of which consists of a bipolar pair of pictures (i.e., a turtle at one end and a butterfly at the other) in a 7 point Likert scale format. The psychometric properties of the instrument were established through two sequential samples of 300 college students followed by 325 individuals of varying ages. The latter included 60 persons over the age of 65. The scale was designed both for people with limited formal education and for whom English is not the primary language. A game board format has recently been developed that allows hand placement instead of a paper and pencil response. This format is especially appropriate for children and older people. Test anxiety is reduced and people with limited mobility can respond.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:12Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.