2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166197
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Refining instruments through factor analysis: But these items can't go together!
Author(s):
Eriksen, Lillian
Author Details:
Lillian Eriksen, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing, Houston, Texas, USA, email: lillian.eriksen@uth.tmc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This paper focuses on the use of factor analysis for the refinement of instruments. The process is illustrated by an example of the use of exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) procedures. The use of EFA ad CFA approaches will be reviewed. The purpose of EFA to determine the linkage between observed variables and their latent or underlying factors will be illustrated. The use of CFA to test the hypothesis that specific links do in fact exist will be demonstrated. Research Questions: 1. Is the initial conceptual framework for the development of an instrument to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care supported by the data from the first sample? 2. Is the factor structure, resulting from the first sample confirmed in a second sample? Instrument: A 33 item, self-report, Likert type scale, to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care in the hospital was developed on framework consisting of 5 factors (Empathy, Dependability, Responsiveness, Information Giving, Tangibles). Subjects: The first sample consisted of 230 patients from a women's hospital in Australia. The second sample consisted of 103 patients from two community hospitals in the Southwestern U.S. Data Collection and Analyses: Questionnaires were distributed to patients the day of or the evening before discharge. They had been patients for at least 2 days. Questionnaires were supplied with sealable envelopes for confidentiality. The EFA, using SPSS for Windows, was performed to examine the supposed factor structure. The process of using the SPSS output to refine the instrument structure will be presented. The CFA, on the second sample, was performed using structural equation modeling. EQS for Windows was used for the modeling. The process of using the EQS output will be presented. Finding: The factor structure was not supported by the data from the first sample. The EFA provided information for refining the instrument. The structural equation modeling used for the CFA produced a respectable model fit which was refined with a respecification. Implications: Both EFA and CFA provide powerful tools to support the refinement of instruments. EFA is a useful approach for identifying concepts underlying a larger number of variables. CFA, using structural equation modeling, can provide a test of the proposed specific relationship between a concept and the indicants of the concept. It is essential to keep in mind that all of this refinement is most dependent on the theoretical issues underlying any instrument. Factor analyses techniques are no substitute for thoughtful substantive consideration.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRefining instruments through factor analysis: But these items can't go together!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorEriksen, Lillianen_US
dc.author.detailsLillian Eriksen, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing, Houston, Texas, USA, email: lillian.eriksen@uth.tmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166197-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper focuses on the use of factor analysis for the refinement of instruments. The process is illustrated by an example of the use of exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) procedures. The use of EFA ad CFA approaches will be reviewed. The purpose of EFA to determine the linkage between observed variables and their latent or underlying factors will be illustrated. The use of CFA to test the hypothesis that specific links do in fact exist will be demonstrated. Research Questions: 1. Is the initial conceptual framework for the development of an instrument to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care supported by the data from the first sample? 2. Is the factor structure, resulting from the first sample confirmed in a second sample? Instrument: A 33 item, self-report, Likert type scale, to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care in the hospital was developed on framework consisting of 5 factors (Empathy, Dependability, Responsiveness, Information Giving, Tangibles). Subjects: The first sample consisted of 230 patients from a women's hospital in Australia. The second sample consisted of 103 patients from two community hospitals in the Southwestern U.S. Data Collection and Analyses: Questionnaires were distributed to patients the day of or the evening before discharge. They had been patients for at least 2 days. Questionnaires were supplied with sealable envelopes for confidentiality. The EFA, using SPSS for Windows, was performed to examine the supposed factor structure. The process of using the SPSS output to refine the instrument structure will be presented. The CFA, on the second sample, was performed using structural equation modeling. EQS for Windows was used for the modeling. The process of using the EQS output will be presented. Finding: The factor structure was not supported by the data from the first sample. The EFA provided information for refining the instrument. The structural equation modeling used for the CFA produced a respectable model fit which was refined with a respecification. Implications: Both EFA and CFA provide powerful tools to support the refinement of instruments. EFA is a useful approach for identifying concepts underlying a larger number of variables. CFA, using structural equation modeling, can provide a test of the proposed specific relationship between a concept and the indicants of the concept. It is essential to keep in mind that all of this refinement is most dependent on the theoretical issues underlying any instrument. Factor analyses techniques are no substitute for thoughtful substantive consideration.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:14Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.