2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166200
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Program evaluation: The employees' perspective
Author(s):
Krepper, Rebecca
Author Details:
Rebecca Krepper, PhD, Associate Professor, Texas Woman's University, Houston, Texas, USA, email: rkrepper@twu.edu
Abstract:
Given today's economic pressures, health-care organizations are seeking ways to realize major gains in quality, productivity, efficiency and improve their competitive edge. St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (SLEH), a 900 bed tertiary care facility, is in the process of implementing a patient care delivery model called "Team Care" as their answer to sustained, high quality, high value, patient-focused care. Evaluation research is one methodology available to assist in making decisions about the effectiveness and efficiency of existing programs. This quasi-experimental study was designed to collect data on the employees perceptions of their work environment prior to and during the transition to Team Care. All health care workers who were assigned to one of the cardiovascular (CV) demonstration units were surveyed using the Work Environment Scale (WES) in 1993, prior to implementation of Team Care. In 1994 all patient care staff from throughout the hospital were asked to complete the WES. This therefore allowed for pre- and post-test comparison of the CV units and comparison of the CV units with those areas just beginning implementation of Team Care. The sample consisted of staff who completed and returned the questionnaire; 1993=75 (52% return) & 1994=548 (56% return). The WES, developed by Moos in 1981, is comprised of ten subscales that assess three underlying dimensions: Relationship, Personal Growth, and System Maintenance and System Change. Descriptive statistics were calculated for each of the deoographic variables and means were determined for each of the ten subscales on the WES. Where appropriate oneway anovas, correlations and t-tests were completed in order to identify significant (a=.05) relationships or differences. In comparing the CV units before and after implementation of Team Care it was found that the workers surveyed in 1994 differed significantly from 1993 in Supervisors Support (u'94=5.3 vs. u'93=6.02); Control (u'94=5.59, down from 6.36 in '93); and Work Pressure (u'94=5.75 up from a low of 4.91 in `93). These results were understandable because the restructuring involved a decrease in the absolute number of middle managers. With the accompanying shared leadership philosophy, workers are encouraged to be more independent. Work Pressure was above the tool mean for all areas in 1994 perhaps due to factors not connected with Team Care. In 1994 the CV area was significantly different from one or more of the other 4 services in regard to their perception of Involvement (u=6.15), Supervisor Support (u=5.3), Peer Cohesion (u=5.38) and Autonomy (u=6.35). The first 3 variables are all subscales of the relationship dimension. These scales assess the extent to which employees are concerned about and committed to their jobs and the extent to which employees are friendly to and supportive of one another. The last subscale, Autonomy, represents the extent to which employees are encouraged to be self-sufficient and to make their own decisions. All of these characteristics are reported in the literature to be outcomes of a patient focused approach to care delivery. The value of benchmarking prior to initiating change cannot be overstated. The WES provided a snapshot of where the staff was in regard to the 10 subscales. This will be invaluable when assessing the impact of Team Care in the years to come.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProgram evaluation: The employees' perspectiveen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrepper, Rebeccaen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Krepper, PhD, Associate Professor, Texas Woman's University, Houston, Texas, USA, email: rkrepper@twu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166200-
dc.description.abstractGiven today's economic pressures, health-care organizations are seeking ways to realize major gains in quality, productivity, efficiency and improve their competitive edge. St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (SLEH), a 900 bed tertiary care facility, is in the process of implementing a patient care delivery model called "Team Care" as their answer to sustained, high quality, high value, patient-focused care. Evaluation research is one methodology available to assist in making decisions about the effectiveness and efficiency of existing programs. This quasi-experimental study was designed to collect data on the employees perceptions of their work environment prior to and during the transition to Team Care. All health care workers who were assigned to one of the cardiovascular (CV) demonstration units were surveyed using the Work Environment Scale (WES) in 1993, prior to implementation of Team Care. In 1994 all patient care staff from throughout the hospital were asked to complete the WES. This therefore allowed for pre- and post-test comparison of the CV units and comparison of the CV units with those areas just beginning implementation of Team Care. The sample consisted of staff who completed and returned the questionnaire; 1993=75 (52% return) & 1994=548 (56% return). The WES, developed by Moos in 1981, is comprised of ten subscales that assess three underlying dimensions: Relationship, Personal Growth, and System Maintenance and System Change. Descriptive statistics were calculated for each of the deoographic variables and means were determined for each of the ten subscales on the WES. Where appropriate oneway anovas, correlations and t-tests were completed in order to identify significant (a=.05) relationships or differences. In comparing the CV units before and after implementation of Team Care it was found that the workers surveyed in 1994 differed significantly from 1993 in Supervisors Support (u'94=5.3 vs. u'93=6.02); Control (u'94=5.59, down from 6.36 in '93); and Work Pressure (u'94=5.75 up from a low of 4.91 in `93). These results were understandable because the restructuring involved a decrease in the absolute number of middle managers. With the accompanying shared leadership philosophy, workers are encouraged to be more independent. Work Pressure was above the tool mean for all areas in 1994 perhaps due to factors not connected with Team Care. In 1994 the CV area was significantly different from one or more of the other 4 services in regard to their perception of Involvement (u=6.15), Supervisor Support (u=5.3), Peer Cohesion (u=5.38) and Autonomy (u=6.35). The first 3 variables are all subscales of the relationship dimension. These scales assess the extent to which employees are concerned about and committed to their jobs and the extent to which employees are friendly to and supportive of one another. The last subscale, Autonomy, represents the extent to which employees are encouraged to be self-sufficient and to make their own decisions. All of these characteristics are reported in the literature to be outcomes of a patient focused approach to care delivery. The value of benchmarking prior to initiating change cannot be overstated. The WES provided a snapshot of where the staff was in regard to the 10 subscales. This will be invaluable when assessing the impact of Team Care in the years to come.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:18Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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