A Study of the Relationship of Job Satisfaction with the Organizational Variablesof Structure, Technology, and Environment in Public Health Nursing (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166201
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study of the Relationship of Job Satisfaction with the Organizational Variablesof Structure, Technology, and Environment in Public Health Nursing (DISS)
Author(s):
Garner, Anne
Author Details:
Anne Garner, PhD, Instructor, UTHSC at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: Garnera@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Study of the relationship of the organizational variables of structure, technology, and environment with job satisfaction in public health nurses in South Carolina. Methodology involved the distribution of a five-part Questionnaire Packet to all licensed nursing personnel in the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC). Each packet contained a letter of introduction and five tools for data collection - Structure Instrument (Alexader, 1986), Technology Instrument (Leatt & Schneck, 1981), Environment Instrument (Leifer, 1975), McCloskey-Mueller Job Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) (McCloskey-Mueller, 1990) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) (Herman, 1990). Two months were allowed for collection of data. Packets were received from 845 personnel for a response rate of 50.6% with the final study sample consisting of 838 nursing personnel representing all 13 health districts and SC DHEC Central Office. Data analysis included descriptive analysis of the demographic characteristics of the study group, and differences in research variables by classification, education, work status, program assignment, years in nursing, and years at DHEC. Analysis of variace was done to determine the significance of differences between groups by demographic variables. Instrument results were analyzed with multiple regression techniques to identify relationships among the research variable. Stepwise regression was used to deterinine the subset(s) of research and demographic variables that best explained the variace in job satisfaction. Correlational approaches were used in exaiming the relationships among demographic and research variables. Comparative techniques of factor analysis and coefficient of congruence were used in examining the performance of these instruments in this population with previous research. Difference score analysis was used to explore the fit if the three dimensions of structure, three dimensions of technology, and environmental uncertainty. Seven relational statements were tested through regression analysis and t-test of quartile rankings. Organizational structure was the critical variable in predictIng job satisfaction in public health nurses in SC DHEC. Structure accounted for 41% of the variance in job satisfaction on the MMSS and 26% on the VAS. Structure remained the critical predictor in the difference score analysis. Two of the seven relational statements were supported. Technology and environment assumed significance only in concert with each other or structure. This study has implications for nurse administrators in public health to create more flexible work environments with active involvement of staff for increased job satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study of the Relationship of Job Satisfaction with the Organizational Variablesof Structure, Technology, and Environment in Public Health Nursing (DISS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarner, Anneen_US
dc.author.detailsAnne Garner, PhD, Instructor, UTHSC at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: Garnera@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166201-
dc.description.abstractStudy of the relationship of the organizational variables of structure, technology, and environment with job satisfaction in public health nurses in South Carolina. Methodology involved the distribution of a five-part Questionnaire Packet to all licensed nursing personnel in the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC). Each packet contained a letter of introduction and five tools for data collection - Structure Instrument (Alexader, 1986), Technology Instrument (Leatt & Schneck, 1981), Environment Instrument (Leifer, 1975), McCloskey-Mueller Job Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) (McCloskey-Mueller, 1990) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) (Herman, 1990). Two months were allowed for collection of data. Packets were received from 845 personnel for a response rate of 50.6% with the final study sample consisting of 838 nursing personnel representing all 13 health districts and SC DHEC Central Office. Data analysis included descriptive analysis of the demographic characteristics of the study group, and differences in research variables by classification, education, work status, program assignment, years in nursing, and years at DHEC. Analysis of variace was done to determine the significance of differences between groups by demographic variables. Instrument results were analyzed with multiple regression techniques to identify relationships among the research variable. Stepwise regression was used to deterinine the subset(s) of research and demographic variables that best explained the variace in job satisfaction. Correlational approaches were used in exaiming the relationships among demographic and research variables. Comparative techniques of factor analysis and coefficient of congruence were used in examining the performance of these instruments in this population with previous research. Difference score analysis was used to explore the fit if the three dimensions of structure, three dimensions of technology, and environmental uncertainty. Seven relational statements were tested through regression analysis and t-test of quartile rankings. Organizational structure was the critical variable in predictIng job satisfaction in public health nurses in SC DHEC. Structure accounted for 41% of the variance in job satisfaction on the MMSS and 26% on the VAS. Structure remained the critical predictor in the difference score analysis. Two of the seven relational statements were supported. Technology and environment assumed significance only in concert with each other or structure. This study has implications for nurse administrators in public health to create more flexible work environments with active involvement of staff for increased job satisfaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:19Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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