Self-Reported Health and Physical Performance Status of Older Adults withArthritis: Implications for Measurement of Disability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166204
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Reported Health and Physical Performance Status of Older Adults withArthritis: Implications for Measurement of Disability
Author(s):
Hogue, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Hogue, PhD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: chogue.uncson@mhs.unc.edu
Abstract:
Introduction: Over 30 million Americans report having arthritis, a generic term for many diseases characterized by inflammation and joint involvement. Prevalence increases with age; by 60, 49% of the population report arthritis. Prevalence continues to increase with age after 60. Disablement is the effect chronic conditions have on the functioning of specific body systems, and people's abilities to perform expected roles in society. While not fatal, osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of musculoskeletal disease, is the most common cause of disability in older adults. Persons with OA have reduced functional performance and aerobic power: they often limit their activity because of pain. Until recently, treatment patterns restricted activity. Levels of activity interact with disease effects, and both are superimposed upon the declines of normal aging. In nursing research on older adults at risk for disablement, investigators are faced with the choice of measures of physical function: self-reported evidence or observation of actual performance, or both. In this study, both methods were used, and this paper reports the relationship between the two methods in a sample of older adults with OA of the hip or knee. Methods: Sixty-seven ambulatory but sedentary older adults (mean age 72) who reside in the community in a rural southeastern county were studied. Subjects were 58% white, 88% female, had 9.6 years of education, had no severe cognitive impairment, and had 2.8 chronic conditions. The Sickeness Impact Profile (SIP), physical dimension, was the self-reported measure of physical health. Performance measures included the 6-minute walk, integrated test of spine, hip, and knee flexion and extension, functional reach, and timed eighteen-foot walmk with and without a 10# bag of groceries. Covariates included age, number of chronic conditions, cognitive performance, arthritis pain, education, race, gender, and the psychosocial dimension of the SIP. Multiple regression analyses were conducted after investigating distributions and multicollinearity. Results: Five performance measures explained 52% of the variance in self-reported physical health: getting up from the floor, function reach, 18-foot walk, 6-minute walk, and ascending stairs. Neither age in years, race, gender, number of chronic condition, education, nor cognitive performance moderated that relationship, but when categorical age (younger or older than 75), arthritis pain, and the psychosocial dimension of the SIP were included as covariates, 72% of the variance was explained. Especially in adults over 75, the presence of pain, and social and emotional factors strenthen the relationship between self-reported physical health and observed physical performance.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Reported Health and Physical Performance Status of Older Adults withArthritis: Implications for Measurement of Disabilityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHogue, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Hogue, PhD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: chogue.uncson@mhs.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166204-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Over 30 million Americans report having arthritis, a generic term for many diseases characterized by inflammation and joint involvement. Prevalence increases with age; by 60, 49% of the population report arthritis. Prevalence continues to increase with age after 60. Disablement is the effect chronic conditions have on the functioning of specific body systems, and people's abilities to perform expected roles in society. While not fatal, osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of musculoskeletal disease, is the most common cause of disability in older adults. Persons with OA have reduced functional performance and aerobic power: they often limit their activity because of pain. Until recently, treatment patterns restricted activity. Levels of activity interact with disease effects, and both are superimposed upon the declines of normal aging. In nursing research on older adults at risk for disablement, investigators are faced with the choice of measures of physical function: self-reported evidence or observation of actual performance, or both. In this study, both methods were used, and this paper reports the relationship between the two methods in a sample of older adults with OA of the hip or knee. Methods: Sixty-seven ambulatory but sedentary older adults (mean age 72) who reside in the community in a rural southeastern county were studied. Subjects were 58% white, 88% female, had 9.6 years of education, had no severe cognitive impairment, and had 2.8 chronic conditions. The Sickeness Impact Profile (SIP), physical dimension, was the self-reported measure of physical health. Performance measures included the 6-minute walk, integrated test of spine, hip, and knee flexion and extension, functional reach, and timed eighteen-foot walmk with and without a 10# bag of groceries. Covariates included age, number of chronic conditions, cognitive performance, arthritis pain, education, race, gender, and the psychosocial dimension of the SIP. Multiple regression analyses were conducted after investigating distributions and multicollinearity. Results: Five performance measures explained 52% of the variance in self-reported physical health: getting up from the floor, function reach, 18-foot walk, 6-minute walk, and ascending stairs. Neither age in years, race, gender, number of chronic condition, education, nor cognitive performance moderated that relationship, but when categorical age (younger or older than 75), arthritis pain, and the psychosocial dimension of the SIP were included as covariates, 72% of the variance was explained. Especially in adults over 75, the presence of pain, and social and emotional factors strenthen the relationship between self-reported physical health and observed physical performance.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:23Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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