2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166208
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethical dilemmas in dealing with cognitively impaired elders
Author(s):
Barnes, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Barnes, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center College of Nursing, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: susan-barnes@ouhsc.edu
Abstract:
This presentation discusses methods of assessing cognitive impairment in elders who may be asked to participate in research. Issues of informed consent, guardianship, and autonomy are important for the researcher to understand when dealing with a population that is vulnerable. Within the geriatric clinical setting, nurses frequently encounter patients who, although legally competent, appear to have their mental capacities compromised or undermined by illness, anxiety, or pain. On the other hand, individuals who have been ruled incompetent to handle routine matters in their daily lives, such as handling of their finances, my still retain the ability to make some limited decisions. These may or may not include decisions to participate in clinical research. It is therefore important for nurses engaged in such activities to be able to assess the mental capacity of these adults as an essential part of the informed consent process. Not only is this an ethical issue, it is also a moral obligation. The Folstein Mini Mental State Exam is discussed as a screening tool to determine patient's mental status and ability to sign consent. The exam can be used to differentiate individuals who can sign consent for themselves and those who need a guardian's permission to participate in research activities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthical dilemmas in dealing with cognitively impaired eldersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Barnes, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center College of Nursing, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: susan-barnes@ouhsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166208-
dc.description.abstractThis presentation discusses methods of assessing cognitive impairment in elders who may be asked to participate in research. Issues of informed consent, guardianship, and autonomy are important for the researcher to understand when dealing with a population that is vulnerable. Within the geriatric clinical setting, nurses frequently encounter patients who, although legally competent, appear to have their mental capacities compromised or undermined by illness, anxiety, or pain. On the other hand, individuals who have been ruled incompetent to handle routine matters in their daily lives, such as handling of their finances, my still retain the ability to make some limited decisions. These may or may not include decisions to participate in clinical research. It is therefore important for nurses engaged in such activities to be able to assess the mental capacity of these adults as an essential part of the informed consent process. Not only is this an ethical issue, it is also a moral obligation. The Folstein Mini Mental State Exam is discussed as a screening tool to determine patient's mental status and ability to sign consent. The exam can be used to differentiate individuals who can sign consent for themselves and those who need a guardian's permission to participate in research activities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:28Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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