2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166212
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Monitoring fever's path of destruction in home and hospital
Author(s):
Holtzclaw, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Holtzclaw, PhD, Director, Office of Nursing Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: HOLTZCLAW@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
The management of febrile symptoms is a significant problem affecting virtually all persons living with AIDS (PLWA). While medical management treats the underlying infection, nursing fever management is directed at symptomatology, regardless of etiology. There are presently no widely held standards for care of febrile symptoms. Common approaches that cool patients are counterproductive and distressful. Cooling during the chill phase of fever evokes warming responses that increase oxygen consumption and cardiorespiratory effort. Methods to keep the patient hydrated during fever are often implemented after-the-fact, when the patient is severely desiccated. A comprehensive study of febrile symptom management was implemented after funding by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) in 1994. The study follows subjects from inpatient hospitalization with febrile illness, to home and outpatient status. The need for continuity between measurements made in these diverse settings led to communication between hospital and home health caregivers. The difference between inpatient sophisticated measurement instruments and those used by the patient for self monitoring is addressed. The use of home followup as a stimulus for self monitoring is also emphasized. Three discrete methodological issues that affect research in febrile symptom management are presented in this symposium. They include, monitoring of febrile patterns and hydration in hospitalized PLWAs, measurement of shivering severity and duration, and cultural and ethnic aspects of home fever management in PLWA.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMonitoring fever's path of destruction in home and hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoltzclaw, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Holtzclaw, PhD, Director, Office of Nursing Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: HOLTZCLAW@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166212-
dc.description.abstractThe management of febrile symptoms is a significant problem affecting virtually all persons living with AIDS (PLWA). While medical management treats the underlying infection, nursing fever management is directed at symptomatology, regardless of etiology. There are presently no widely held standards for care of febrile symptoms. Common approaches that cool patients are counterproductive and distressful. Cooling during the chill phase of fever evokes warming responses that increase oxygen consumption and cardiorespiratory effort. Methods to keep the patient hydrated during fever are often implemented after-the-fact, when the patient is severely desiccated. A comprehensive study of febrile symptom management was implemented after funding by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) in 1994. The study follows subjects from inpatient hospitalization with febrile illness, to home and outpatient status. The need for continuity between measurements made in these diverse settings led to communication between hospital and home health caregivers. The difference between inpatient sophisticated measurement instruments and those used by the patient for self monitoring is addressed. The use of home followup as a stimulus for self monitoring is also emphasized. Three discrete methodological issues that affect research in febrile symptom management are presented in this symposium. They include, monitoring of febrile patterns and hydration in hospitalized PLWAs, measurement of shivering severity and duration, and cultural and ethnic aspects of home fever management in PLWA.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:33Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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