2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166213
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Monitoring Fever Patterns and Hydration in Hospitalized PLWA
Author(s):
Taliaferro, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Taliaferro, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: taliaferro@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Little has been documented about the patterns and non-specific responses associated with fever in persons living with AIDS (PLWA). These cytokine-modulated effects often generate "hectic" febrile courses, with precipitous rises and declines within short spans of time. In order to quantify relationships between febrile symptoms, it is necessary to make contact with the subject at the onset of temperature rise and collect data throughout the episode. To study the effects of fever on hydration in PLWA, an assessment of pre-existing water loss must occur prior to the onset of a particular febrile event. Identifying the start and finish of a febrile episode has been problematic, using routine temperature-taking schedules. Waiting for unit personnel to notify the study team results in observations that begin mid-episode, or during fever defervescence. Specific Aims: In a NINR/NIH funded study of febrile symptom management, pilot work was done to determine 1) the extent to which the temperatures taken routinely on the hospital AIDS unit captured temperature elevations during an 8 hour shift; 2) patterns and frequency of fever elevations in PLWA inpatients; 3) changes in hydration following febrile episodes; and 4) relationships between hydration and severity of temperature elevations during fever. Methods: Subjects (n=35) were enrolled on admission to the HIV/AIDS unit of a southwestern university-based hospital. Daily rounds were made by investigators and oral temperatures recorded from routine once-a-shift measurements on patient charts. Temperatures were taken mid-shift by the study team. If readings were over 37 degress C, temperatures were repeated at 15 minute intervals until the direction of rise or fall was determined. If temperatures continued climbing, the patient was monitored continuously throughout the febrile episode. Baseline weights were obtained. Hydration was assessed on admission by physical exam of skin and tissue turgor, eyeball resistance, and moisture of tongue and mucous membranes. Weight and hydration was assessed 12 hours post febrile episode. Findings and Implications: Routine once-a-shift measurement of body temperatures fail to capture significant numbers of febrile episodes. To detect episodes of fever at the onset, close vigilance is necessary at the first sign of temperature rise. Hydration is influenced by many factors in PLWA, other than fever. Febrile patterns are hectic and intermittent in nature, often accompanied by profuse sweating.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMonitoring Fever Patterns and Hydration in Hospitalized PLWAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaliaferro, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Taliaferro, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: taliaferro@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166213-
dc.description.abstractLittle has been documented about the patterns and non-specific responses associated with fever in persons living with AIDS (PLWA). These cytokine-modulated effects often generate "hectic" febrile courses, with precipitous rises and declines within short spans of time. In order to quantify relationships between febrile symptoms, it is necessary to make contact with the subject at the onset of temperature rise and collect data throughout the episode. To study the effects of fever on hydration in PLWA, an assessment of pre-existing water loss must occur prior to the onset of a particular febrile event. Identifying the start and finish of a febrile episode has been problematic, using routine temperature-taking schedules. Waiting for unit personnel to notify the study team results in observations that begin mid-episode, or during fever defervescence. Specific Aims: In a NINR/NIH funded study of febrile symptom management, pilot work was done to determine 1) the extent to which the temperatures taken routinely on the hospital AIDS unit captured temperature elevations during an 8 hour shift; 2) patterns and frequency of fever elevations in PLWA inpatients; 3) changes in hydration following febrile episodes; and 4) relationships between hydration and severity of temperature elevations during fever. Methods: Subjects (n=35) were enrolled on admission to the HIV/AIDS unit of a southwestern university-based hospital. Daily rounds were made by investigators and oral temperatures recorded from routine once-a-shift measurements on patient charts. Temperatures were taken mid-shift by the study team. If readings were over 37 degress C, temperatures were repeated at 15 minute intervals until the direction of rise or fall was determined. If temperatures continued climbing, the patient was monitored continuously throughout the febrile episode. Baseline weights were obtained. Hydration was assessed on admission by physical exam of skin and tissue turgor, eyeball resistance, and moisture of tongue and mucous membranes. Weight and hydration was assessed 12 hours post febrile episode. Findings and Implications: Routine once-a-shift measurement of body temperatures fail to capture significant numbers of febrile episodes. To detect episodes of fever at the onset, close vigilance is necessary at the first sign of temperature rise. Hydration is influenced by many factors in PLWA, other than fever. Febrile patterns are hectic and intermittent in nature, often accompanied by profuse sweating.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:35Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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