2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166215
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural and Ethnic Aspects of Home Fever Management in PLWA (DISS)
Author(s):
Robinson, Beverly
Author Details:
Beverly Robinson, PhD, Professor/Associate Dean of Graduate Nursing Program, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: robinsonb@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Opportunistic infections with fever commonly complicate the condition of persons living with Acquired lmmunodeficiency Syndrome (PLWA). Despite immunosuppression, PLWA are known to experience severe febrile responses. Nurses in community settings are often challenged by the balance of traditional Western medical therapies and cultural and/or ethnic customs and practices. These approaches may coexist peacefully, augmenting one another, or be in therapeutic opposition. Therefore, the nature of both the febrile course and the prevailing modes of home treatment are of crucial importance to the health care provider. Specific Aims: Almost no data exist about how fever/fever management is viewed among ethnic/minority populations. Therefore, this study was designed to provide information about 1) the meaning of fever, 2) use of folk/traditional medicine for fever care, 3) beliefs about causes of fever and 4) the perception of successful fever treatment. Methods: The unit of sampling was the family of subjects (n=35) who were PLWA enrolled in a comprehensive study of febrile symptom management. Subjects, caregivers and significant others included Hispanic, African American and Anglo men and women. Open-ended interviews that encouraged PLWA and their caregivers to disclose treatment methods were used to obtain pertinent information about folk methods for fever management at home. This naturalistic data of verbatim responses provide text for content analysis, as described by Krippendorff, of fever management practices. Culturally-based practices of the patient and caregivers must be understood and acknowledged as having value before decisions about intervention strategies for fever management can be appropriately and successfully implemented. Findings: While no inferences can be drawn from these qualitative data, the symbolic importance of the tradition, the context in which the meaning or belief is held, and the influence these beliefs play on the person's practice of fever care holds important cues to assessment and interventions of PLWA in home settings. Some beliefs are religious in origin, others are superstitions, still others seem based in tradition, rather than any known contingencies. Implications: The person's perception of disease and treatment also influence their perceptions of symptoms. The nurse caregiver must work in concert with the person/family's belief system to keep the patient actively engaged in effective symptom management. The fact that fevers are often self-limiting may add to the family's perception that folk remedies are effective.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural and Ethnic Aspects of Home Fever Management in PLWA (DISS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Beverlyen_US
dc.author.detailsBeverly Robinson, PhD, Professor/Associate Dean of Graduate Nursing Program, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: robinsonb@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166215-
dc.description.abstractOpportunistic infections with fever commonly complicate the condition of persons living with Acquired lmmunodeficiency Syndrome (PLWA). Despite immunosuppression, PLWA are known to experience severe febrile responses. Nurses in community settings are often challenged by the balance of traditional Western medical therapies and cultural and/or ethnic customs and practices. These approaches may coexist peacefully, augmenting one another, or be in therapeutic opposition. Therefore, the nature of both the febrile course and the prevailing modes of home treatment are of crucial importance to the health care provider. Specific Aims: Almost no data exist about how fever/fever management is viewed among ethnic/minority populations. Therefore, this study was designed to provide information about 1) the meaning of fever, 2) use of folk/traditional medicine for fever care, 3) beliefs about causes of fever and 4) the perception of successful fever treatment. Methods: The unit of sampling was the family of subjects (n=35) who were PLWA enrolled in a comprehensive study of febrile symptom management. Subjects, caregivers and significant others included Hispanic, African American and Anglo men and women. Open-ended interviews that encouraged PLWA and their caregivers to disclose treatment methods were used to obtain pertinent information about folk methods for fever management at home. This naturalistic data of verbatim responses provide text for content analysis, as described by Krippendorff, of fever management practices. Culturally-based practices of the patient and caregivers must be understood and acknowledged as having value before decisions about intervention strategies for fever management can be appropriately and successfully implemented. Findings: While no inferences can be drawn from these qualitative data, the symbolic importance of the tradition, the context in which the meaning or belief is held, and the influence these beliefs play on the person's practice of fever care holds important cues to assessment and interventions of PLWA in home settings. Some beliefs are religious in origin, others are superstitions, still others seem based in tradition, rather than any known contingencies. Implications: The person's perception of disease and treatment also influence their perceptions of symptoms. The nurse caregiver must work in concert with the person/family's belief system to keep the patient actively engaged in effective symptom management. The fact that fevers are often self-limiting may add to the family's perception that folk remedies are effective.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:37Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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