2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166216
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Alcohol Use Among Rural Adolescents
Author(s):
Felton, Gwen; Dowda, Marsha; Saunders, Ruth; Trost, Stuart
Author Details:
Gwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.edu; Marsha Dowda; Ruth Saunders; Stuart Trost
Abstract:
Alcohol use is common in adolescence. Recent studies suggest that use may begin as early as age ten. However, less is known about alcohol use during early adolescence, particularly among rural youths. This study examined the association between risk indicators and alcohol use, including experimental use, in a sample (N=336) of fifth graders in two rural school districts in the southeast. The students raged in age from 9 to 12 (M=10) and were 53% female and 74% African- American. Data were collected using instruments designed to assess the health behaviors of students, peers, and family members. Approximately 36% (n=122) reported alcohol use. Multiple Logistic regression was used to identify risk indicators, i.e., age, gender, race, cigarette smoking, physical activity, and alcohol use by parents/surrogates and peer. A four factor model resulted. Alcohol use was strongly associated with smoking (OR=11.99, 95% CI=5.9, 24.3). Among the sociodemographic variables, male gender had an OR of 3.78 (95% CI=2.2, 6.7) and father's alcohol use also predicted use (OR=2.75, 95% CI=1.6, 4.8). An odds ratio of 0.73(95% CI=0.5, 1.03) for physical activity may indicate that students who were more physically active were less likely use alcohol. Among users many had only one or two episodes, 18% reported weekend and holiday use, and 3% reported weekend and weekday use. Of the parental behaviors, only father's alcohol use contributed to the model with 72% having fathers who used alcohol. The frequency of father's use included "sometimes" (45%) and "a lot" (10%). Almost 25% reported having tried cigarette smoking with 4% initiating smoking by age 9 or younger compared to 10% who had used alcohol by the same age. Of alcohol "users", 53% also smoked. The findings suggest young adolescents should be viewed as active decision-makers within the context of their school, family, and community environments, rather than as naive children. The extent of alcohol and tobacco use calls for school and community health professionals to develop programmatic efforts within a comprehensive school health program, including community outreach programs focusing on interventions in rural areas.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Alcohol Use Among Rural Adolescentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Gwenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDowda, Marshaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrost, Stuarten_US
dc.author.detailsGwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.edu; Marsha Dowda; Ruth Saunders; Stuart Trosten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166216-
dc.description.abstractAlcohol use is common in adolescence. Recent studies suggest that use may begin as early as age ten. However, less is known about alcohol use during early adolescence, particularly among rural youths. This study examined the association between risk indicators and alcohol use, including experimental use, in a sample (N=336) of fifth graders in two rural school districts in the southeast. The students raged in age from 9 to 12 (M=10) and were 53% female and 74% African- American. Data were collected using instruments designed to assess the health behaviors of students, peers, and family members. Approximately 36% (n=122) reported alcohol use. Multiple Logistic regression was used to identify risk indicators, i.e., age, gender, race, cigarette smoking, physical activity, and alcohol use by parents/surrogates and peer. A four factor model resulted. Alcohol use was strongly associated with smoking (OR=11.99, 95% CI=5.9, 24.3). Among the sociodemographic variables, male gender had an OR of 3.78 (95% CI=2.2, 6.7) and father's alcohol use also predicted use (OR=2.75, 95% CI=1.6, 4.8). An odds ratio of 0.73(95% CI=0.5, 1.03) for physical activity may indicate that students who were more physically active were less likely use alcohol. Among users many had only one or two episodes, 18% reported weekend and holiday use, and 3% reported weekend and weekday use. Of the parental behaviors, only father's alcohol use contributed to the model with 72% having fathers who used alcohol. The frequency of father's use included "sometimes" (45%) and "a lot" (10%). Almost 25% reported having tried cigarette smoking with 4% initiating smoking by age 9 or younger compared to 10% who had used alcohol by the same age. Of alcohol "users", 53% also smoked. The findings suggest young adolescents should be viewed as active decision-makers within the context of their school, family, and community environments, rather than as naive children. The extent of alcohol and tobacco use calls for school and community health professionals to develop programmatic efforts within a comprehensive school health program, including community outreach programs focusing on interventions in rural areas.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:38Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.