2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166219
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents and the task of pregnancy
Author(s):
Salisbury, Michele
Author Details:
Michele Salisbury, PhD, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: Michele.Salisbury@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Background: Rubin described four tasks of pregnancy that accompany prenatal role attainment in the adult pregnant woman; however, she doubted the ability of adolescents to engage in these tasks and thereby attain the maternal role particularly in the prenatal period. Three tasks occur before the birth of the baby: seeking safe passage, ensuring acceptance by significant others and binding in to the child. The study will use a qualitative approach and Rubin's tasks of pregnancy to explore the adolescent's engagement in the tasks of pregnancy and thereby their progress toward attainment of the maternal role. Method: Thirty-two adolescents between the ages of 13 and 18 in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and interviewed at a public health department. The mean age was 17.1; 27 were white and 5 were Black. Twenty-three were primigravidas, and 3 were having their third baby. After birth of the baby, the researcher did a chart review to ascertain outcome pregnancy data: birthweight, maternal weight gain and number of prenatal visits. Results: Seeking safe passage: 19 of the 32 adolescents sought prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy. Furthermore, the adolescents stated they had changed behaviors to help safeguard their own health and that of their unborn baby. Ensuring acceptance by significant others: initial fear of negative reactions of family members to the pregnancy is a barrier to seeking safe passage, nevertheless, by the end of the pregnancy, all adolescents had negotiated support for themselves -- 14 with their mothers but others with sisters, aunts or other family members. Binding in to the unborn child: these adolescents extended the search for safe passage to the remainder of the pregnancy. The mean number of prenatal visits for the participants was 12.4; they gained a mean weight of 35 pounds and their babies had a mean weight of 3388 grams: all parameters that are at the upper end of normal limits. Discussion: This study provides evidence that adolescents engage in the tasks of pregnancy. Rubin's apprehension that adolescents would be unable to complete the tasks of pregnancy and therefore be unable to progress toward attainment of the maternal role is unfounded for this sample. Nevertheless, it does suggest that for adolescents, the task of ensuring acceptance by significant others assumes heightened importance because it seems that safe passage cannot be undertaken until the adolescent negotiates at least some rudimentary acceptance. Nurses working in prenatal clinics or family planning clinics where pregnancy tests are done need to be aware of the possibility of this occurrence and be able to counsel the adolescent about strategies to use with their families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents and the task of pregnancyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalisbury, Micheleen_US
dc.author.detailsMichele Salisbury, PhD, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: Michele.Salisbury@mcmail.vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166219-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Rubin described four tasks of pregnancy that accompany prenatal role attainment in the adult pregnant woman; however, she doubted the ability of adolescents to engage in these tasks and thereby attain the maternal role particularly in the prenatal period. Three tasks occur before the birth of the baby: seeking safe passage, ensuring acceptance by significant others and binding in to the child. The study will use a qualitative approach and Rubin's tasks of pregnancy to explore the adolescent's engagement in the tasks of pregnancy and thereby their progress toward attainment of the maternal role. Method: Thirty-two adolescents between the ages of 13 and 18 in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and interviewed at a public health department. The mean age was 17.1; 27 were white and 5 were Black. Twenty-three were primigravidas, and 3 were having their third baby. After birth of the baby, the researcher did a chart review to ascertain outcome pregnancy data: birthweight, maternal weight gain and number of prenatal visits. Results: Seeking safe passage: 19 of the 32 adolescents sought prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy. Furthermore, the adolescents stated they had changed behaviors to help safeguard their own health and that of their unborn baby. Ensuring acceptance by significant others: initial fear of negative reactions of family members to the pregnancy is a barrier to seeking safe passage, nevertheless, by the end of the pregnancy, all adolescents had negotiated support for themselves -- 14 with their mothers but others with sisters, aunts or other family members. Binding in to the unborn child: these adolescents extended the search for safe passage to the remainder of the pregnancy. The mean number of prenatal visits for the participants was 12.4; they gained a mean weight of 35 pounds and their babies had a mean weight of 3388 grams: all parameters that are at the upper end of normal limits. Discussion: This study provides evidence that adolescents engage in the tasks of pregnancy. Rubin's apprehension that adolescents would be unable to complete the tasks of pregnancy and therefore be unable to progress toward attainment of the maternal role is unfounded for this sample. Nevertheless, it does suggest that for adolescents, the task of ensuring acceptance by significant others assumes heightened importance because it seems that safe passage cannot be undertaken until the adolescent negotiates at least some rudimentary acceptance. Nurses working in prenatal clinics or family planning clinics where pregnancy tests are done need to be aware of the possibility of this occurrence and be able to counsel the adolescent about strategies to use with their families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:42Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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