2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166220
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of the Nursing Management Diagnosis Ineffective Change Management
Author(s):
Morrison, Ruby
Author Details:
Ruby Morrison, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Alabama, Capstone College of Nursing, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA, email: rmorriso@nursing.ua.edu
Abstract:
Diagnosing the problems of nursing organizational units is essential to effective management decision making, just as diagnosing actual or potential health problems is essential for planning effective nursing care. Nursing management diagnosis is a judgment about nursing organizational problems that provides a basis for nurse manager interventions to achieve outcomes for which the nurse manager is accountable. A nursing organizational problem is a discrepancy between what should be happening and what is actually happening that prevents the goals of nursing from being accomplished in the organization. In a previous study 72 nursing management diagnoses were identified from problems and judgments described by nurse managers. Subsequently, these diagnoses were validated and prioritized. The nursing management diagnosis "ineffective change management" was validated by 97.8% of the 136 nurse managers participants. A priority score, calculated from the frequency of occurrence and level of disruption associated with the diagnosis, indicated that ineffective change management was a very high priority with a score of 7.837 on a scale of 1 to 10. The purpose of this study was to develop the definition, defining characteristics and interventions for the nursing management diagnosis "ineffective change management". Focus group discussions were conducted with two groups of nurse managers (n=17) to identify etiologies, defining characteristics, and interventions for the diagnosis. Literature review and analysis of interviews resulted in defining ineffective change management as the state in which activities that are designed to improve individuals, groups, or organizations were unsuccessful in meeting goals, were inefficient in use of resources and/or resulted in dissatisfaction. Etiologies of ineffective change management included lack of Iong range vision, poor communication, failure to include persons responsible for implementing change in the planning of change, failure to evaluate change in progress and make adjustments as needed, unclear expectations, incorrect assessment and diagnosis of organization and the impact of change, inadequate time to plan for change, and too many changes concurrently. Defining characteristics include organizational issues (such as decreased productivity, negative public image, decreased cost effectiveness, and disorganization), personal issues of staff and managers (such as increased stress, decreased morale and job satisfaction, self doubt, and frustration), and consumer issues (such as dissatisfaction with service and mistrust). Interventions focused on reversing the etiologies, primarily communicate clearly, involve others in all phases of the change process, and provide the support needed to implement change. Nurse manager responsibilities for implementing change effectively could be enhanced by using the findings from this study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of the Nursing Management Diagnosis Ineffective Change Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Rubyen_US
dc.author.detailsRuby Morrison, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Alabama, Capstone College of Nursing, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA, email: rmorriso@nursing.ua.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166220-
dc.description.abstractDiagnosing the problems of nursing organizational units is essential to effective management decision making, just as diagnosing actual or potential health problems is essential for planning effective nursing care. Nursing management diagnosis is a judgment about nursing organizational problems that provides a basis for nurse manager interventions to achieve outcomes for which the nurse manager is accountable. A nursing organizational problem is a discrepancy between what should be happening and what is actually happening that prevents the goals of nursing from being accomplished in the organization. In a previous study 72 nursing management diagnoses were identified from problems and judgments described by nurse managers. Subsequently, these diagnoses were validated and prioritized. The nursing management diagnosis "ineffective change management" was validated by 97.8% of the 136 nurse managers participants. A priority score, calculated from the frequency of occurrence and level of disruption associated with the diagnosis, indicated that ineffective change management was a very high priority with a score of 7.837 on a scale of 1 to 10. The purpose of this study was to develop the definition, defining characteristics and interventions for the nursing management diagnosis "ineffective change management". Focus group discussions were conducted with two groups of nurse managers (n=17) to identify etiologies, defining characteristics, and interventions for the diagnosis. Literature review and analysis of interviews resulted in defining ineffective change management as the state in which activities that are designed to improve individuals, groups, or organizations were unsuccessful in meeting goals, were inefficient in use of resources and/or resulted in dissatisfaction. Etiologies of ineffective change management included lack of Iong range vision, poor communication, failure to include persons responsible for implementing change in the planning of change, failure to evaluate change in progress and make adjustments as needed, unclear expectations, incorrect assessment and diagnosis of organization and the impact of change, inadequate time to plan for change, and too many changes concurrently. Defining characteristics include organizational issues (such as decreased productivity, negative public image, decreased cost effectiveness, and disorganization), personal issues of staff and managers (such as increased stress, decreased morale and job satisfaction, self doubt, and frustration), and consumer issues (such as dissatisfaction with service and mistrust). Interventions focused on reversing the etiologies, primarily communicate clearly, involve others in all phases of the change process, and provide the support needed to implement change. Nurse manager responsibilities for implementing change effectively could be enhanced by using the findings from this study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:43Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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