2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166223
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bending the Tenets of Experimental Design to Achieve Cultural Compatibility
Author(s):
Mishel, Merle
Author Details:
Merle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
As nursing moves to intervention research, the profession must address the design and implementation of interventions for the underserved and not solely attend to the easy to access and available typical Caucasian middle class subject. In this symposium we will present efforts to address the needs of underserved and understudied minority populations and discuss the threats these efforts raise concerning principles of traditional experimental design. Two intervention trials, Management of Uncertainty in Prostate Cancer (RO1NR/CA03782-03) and Management of Uncertainty in Older Women with Breast Cancer (RO1CA57764-03) are being conducted to examine the racial/ethnic differences in the efficacy of a 10 week telephone delivered psycho-educational intervention for reducing uncertainty, enhancing self-care, improving psycho-social adjustment, reducing emotional distress and improving quality of life. The study populations include women over 50 with breast cancer newly diagnosed at any stage who are undergoing treatment and men with stage B or C prostate cancer who are recovering from surgery or undergoing radiation. The goal for composition of both studies is equal numbers of African-American and Caucasian subjects. In the design of studies to address the underserved, the investigative team must confront some of the traditional rules for experimental design. Issues in revision of instruments for compatibility with local dialects and cultural orientation include the global versus specific construct validity of concepts under study, use of multiple indicators for assessing concepts, and approaches for assessing specificity of measures when modified for a specific population. Areas that are often poorly elaborated in intervention research become priority areas when working with the underserved. The importance of attention to recruitment and retention will be discussed from the position of removing sources of error using Lipsey's work on design sensitivity. The importance of involving multiple stake holders in the recruitment of subjects will be discussed from the perspective of balancing a community involvement orientation with the notion of controlling for sources of error. Similarly retention efforts are more elaborate when samples are not those traditionally involved in research. Traditional experimental design has to be balanced with a naturalistic paradigm that allows for the relationship between investigator and subject. The integration of a naturalistic perspective into the retention effort for a clinical trial is a new notion to be presented. Determining the integrity of an intervention that flows and undulates as new information about the underserved sample is learned requires a view of intervention as evolving and not static. The threat that this causes to traditional views of experimental design will be discussed integrating principles form naturalistic methodologies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBending the Tenets of Experimental Design to Achieve Cultural Compatibilityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMishel, Merleen_US
dc.author.detailsMerle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166223-
dc.description.abstractAs nursing moves to intervention research, the profession must address the design and implementation of interventions for the underserved and not solely attend to the easy to access and available typical Caucasian middle class subject. In this symposium we will present efforts to address the needs of underserved and understudied minority populations and discuss the threats these efforts raise concerning principles of traditional experimental design. Two intervention trials, Management of Uncertainty in Prostate Cancer (RO1NR/CA03782-03) and Management of Uncertainty in Older Women with Breast Cancer (RO1CA57764-03) are being conducted to examine the racial/ethnic differences in the efficacy of a 10 week telephone delivered psycho-educational intervention for reducing uncertainty, enhancing self-care, improving psycho-social adjustment, reducing emotional distress and improving quality of life. The study populations include women over 50 with breast cancer newly diagnosed at any stage who are undergoing treatment and men with stage B or C prostate cancer who are recovering from surgery or undergoing radiation. The goal for composition of both studies is equal numbers of African-American and Caucasian subjects. In the design of studies to address the underserved, the investigative team must confront some of the traditional rules for experimental design. Issues in revision of instruments for compatibility with local dialects and cultural orientation include the global versus specific construct validity of concepts under study, use of multiple indicators for assessing concepts, and approaches for assessing specificity of measures when modified for a specific population. Areas that are often poorly elaborated in intervention research become priority areas when working with the underserved. The importance of attention to recruitment and retention will be discussed from the position of removing sources of error using Lipsey's work on design sensitivity. The importance of involving multiple stake holders in the recruitment of subjects will be discussed from the perspective of balancing a community involvement orientation with the notion of controlling for sources of error. Similarly retention efforts are more elaborate when samples are not those traditionally involved in research. Traditional experimental design has to be balanced with a naturalistic paradigm that allows for the relationship between investigator and subject. The integration of a naturalistic perspective into the retention effort for a clinical trial is a new notion to be presented. Determining the integrity of an intervention that flows and undulates as new information about the underserved sample is learned requires a view of intervention as evolving and not static. The threat that this causes to traditional views of experimental design will be discussed integrating principles form naturalistic methodologies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:46Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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