2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166225
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment of Minority Subjects for Nursing Research
Author(s):
Germino, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Germino, PhD, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: germino@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Minorities are often poorly represented in health research (Graham, 1992). Trials of behavioral interventions to promote coping with cancer are notorious for their lack of representative samples. The purpose of this paper is to describe three levels of strategies evolved to enhance the recruitment of African-American men and women as subjects in two nursing intervention studies: planning, design and implementation strategies. In planning the trials, problems recruiting minority subjects, in particular rural and elderly minority subjects, were anticipated. A minority co-investigator was an active member of the team from the initial preparation of proposals for funding. Literature on minority recruitment was critically reviewed and the few suggested strategies were considered. Other investigators in the state who had been or were in the process of studying African-Americans were consulted for suggestions. Strategies planned in the design phase included selection of sites that maximized numbers of potential minority subjects; use of multiple sites; matching of recruiter/data collectors to subjects by gender and race; matching of nurses delivering the telephone intervention to subjects by gender and race; adaptation of study instruments to a population with high levels of semi- literacy and illiteracy as well as to colloquialisms common in the region among the populations to be studied. Once the study was implemented and the first six months of data collection had been completed, it was evident that, in spite of these strategies, a number of additional barriers to inclusion of minority subjects existed and there were at least two distinct kinds of recruitment problems. For elderly women with breast cancer, in spite of increasing the number of sites with the largest populations, the numbers of older African-American women being diagnosed with breast cancer were much smaller than anticipated. Once identified, these women were generally willing to participate in the study; refusal rates were very low. For African-American men with prostate cancer, the numbers anticipated were available but the refusal rate for participation reached 50%. Barriers which became evident as the study progressed included lack of adequate and accurate information about breast and prostate cancer in the African-American community, especially among elderly African-Americans; longstanding distrust of the health care system and suspicion about participation in research studies; lack of economic or other perceived benefits of participating in research. While some of these problems were mentioned in the literature and by other investigators, the extent and intensity of the barriers was not clear until the study was underway. Using knowledge of these barriers and their roots in cultural belief systems, additional strategies have been developed to enhance minority recruitment. Hiring of community workers who are respected and visible members of the communities in which recruitment is ongoing builds on existing relationships and provides a bridge between African-Americans and the university based study. Specific strategies designed to enhance community awareness of breast and prostate cancer, provide participation incentives and enhance visibility will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment of Minority Subjects for Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGermino, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Germino, PhD, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: germino@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166225-
dc.description.abstractMinorities are often poorly represented in health research (Graham, 1992). Trials of behavioral interventions to promote coping with cancer are notorious for their lack of representative samples. The purpose of this paper is to describe three levels of strategies evolved to enhance the recruitment of African-American men and women as subjects in two nursing intervention studies: planning, design and implementation strategies. In planning the trials, problems recruiting minority subjects, in particular rural and elderly minority subjects, were anticipated. A minority co-investigator was an active member of the team from the initial preparation of proposals for funding. Literature on minority recruitment was critically reviewed and the few suggested strategies were considered. Other investigators in the state who had been or were in the process of studying African-Americans were consulted for suggestions. Strategies planned in the design phase included selection of sites that maximized numbers of potential minority subjects; use of multiple sites; matching of recruiter/data collectors to subjects by gender and race; matching of nurses delivering the telephone intervention to subjects by gender and race; adaptation of study instruments to a population with high levels of semi- literacy and illiteracy as well as to colloquialisms common in the region among the populations to be studied. Once the study was implemented and the first six months of data collection had been completed, it was evident that, in spite of these strategies, a number of additional barriers to inclusion of minority subjects existed and there were at least two distinct kinds of recruitment problems. For elderly women with breast cancer, in spite of increasing the number of sites with the largest populations, the numbers of older African-American women being diagnosed with breast cancer were much smaller than anticipated. Once identified, these women were generally willing to participate in the study; refusal rates were very low. For African-American men with prostate cancer, the numbers anticipated were available but the refusal rate for participation reached 50%. Barriers which became evident as the study progressed included lack of adequate and accurate information about breast and prostate cancer in the African-American community, especially among elderly African-Americans; longstanding distrust of the health care system and suspicion about participation in research studies; lack of economic or other perceived benefits of participating in research. While some of these problems were mentioned in the literature and by other investigators, the extent and intensity of the barriers was not clear until the study was underway. Using knowledge of these barriers and their roots in cultural belief systems, additional strategies have been developed to enhance minority recruitment. Hiring of community workers who are respected and visible members of the communities in which recruitment is ongoing builds on existing relationships and provides a bridge between African-Americans and the university based study. Specific strategies designed to enhance community awareness of breast and prostate cancer, provide participation incentives and enhance visibility will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:49Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.