2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166226
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interventions Sensitive to Regional and Cultural Issues
Author(s):
Mishel, Merle
Author Details:
Merle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to describe the culturally specific issues that emerged when a nursing intervention for breast and prostate cancer patients was delivered to a sammple who differed both regionally and culturally from those on whom the intervention was previously tested. The intervention is being delivered to rural southerners both Caucasian and African-American men with prostate cancer and women with breast cancer with special attention to older individuals. Whereas the original testing of the intervention had been with primarily a middle aged Caucasian middle class sample of breast cancer patients located in the Southwest, the intervention has been modified for applicability to a different population. The importance of testing an intervention on a variety of patients is to determine the generalizability of the program, the robustness of the intervention strategies across culture, social class and race and the cultural compatibility of the intervention. Although the testing of interventions on non-whites is considered important, African-Americans and low income individuals are present in less then 10% of the studies on psycho-social interventions for cancer (Anderson, 1992). The number of studies that include a sufficient number of African-Americans to analyze by race has declined in the last 20 years (Graham, 1992). Such a trend indicates that psycho-education interventions may move into nursing practice with insufficient study for their applicability to the range of patients seeking care. In the planning stage of the current intervention studies, modification of the intervention required identifying the components that were not culturally or regionally compatible. Specific attention was given to identifying cultural beliefs about cancer and cancer treatments. The specific strategies used to achieve culture compatibility will be discussed. In the intervention phase of the study, it was evident that attempts at achieving cultural relevance were incomplete. Additional issues emerged which included the interplay of religious beliefs and acceptance of medical care, the impact of financial restrictions on ability to manage side effects of treatment by physicians among African-American and Caucasian patients, limitations in social resources, cultural beliefs about managing symptoms, cultural norms about discussing sexual dysfunction and alternative expressions of intimacy, cultural norms about accepting help and discussing topics such as incontinence. These topics and others that emerged in the delivery of the intervention will be discussed in the paper. New interventions had to be developed and prior strategies had to be modified to address the culturally specific topics that emerged. These strategies will be presented such as the use of faith and religion as a source of support, gradual introduction of suggestions for expressing sexual intimacy, resources for handling employment discrimination and others.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterventions Sensitive to Regional and Cultural Issuesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMishel, Merleen_US
dc.author.detailsMerle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166226-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to describe the culturally specific issues that emerged when a nursing intervention for breast and prostate cancer patients was delivered to a sammple who differed both regionally and culturally from those on whom the intervention was previously tested. The intervention is being delivered to rural southerners both Caucasian and African-American men with prostate cancer and women with breast cancer with special attention to older individuals. Whereas the original testing of the intervention had been with primarily a middle aged Caucasian middle class sample of breast cancer patients located in the Southwest, the intervention has been modified for applicability to a different population. The importance of testing an intervention on a variety of patients is to determine the generalizability of the program, the robustness of the intervention strategies across culture, social class and race and the cultural compatibility of the intervention. Although the testing of interventions on non-whites is considered important, African-Americans and low income individuals are present in less then 10% of the studies on psycho-social interventions for cancer (Anderson, 1992). The number of studies that include a sufficient number of African-Americans to analyze by race has declined in the last 20 years (Graham, 1992). Such a trend indicates that psycho-education interventions may move into nursing practice with insufficient study for their applicability to the range of patients seeking care. In the planning stage of the current intervention studies, modification of the intervention required identifying the components that were not culturally or regionally compatible. Specific attention was given to identifying cultural beliefs about cancer and cancer treatments. The specific strategies used to achieve culture compatibility will be discussed. In the intervention phase of the study, it was evident that attempts at achieving cultural relevance were incomplete. Additional issues emerged which included the interplay of religious beliefs and acceptance of medical care, the impact of financial restrictions on ability to manage side effects of treatment by physicians among African-American and Caucasian patients, limitations in social resources, cultural beliefs about managing symptoms, cultural norms about discussing sexual dysfunction and alternative expressions of intimacy, cultural norms about accepting help and discussing topics such as incontinence. These topics and others that emerged in the delivery of the intervention will be discussed in the paper. New interventions had to be developed and prior strategies had to be modified to address the culturally specific topics that emerged. These strategies will be presented such as the use of faith and religion as a source of support, gradual introduction of suggestions for expressing sexual intimacy, resources for handling employment discrimination and others.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:51Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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