2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166228
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The influence of psychosocial factors on women's adjustment to diabetes
Author(s):
Willoughby, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Willoughby, PhD, Assistant Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA, email: willoud@clemson.edu
Abstract:
Successful adjustment to a chronic illness such as diabetes mellitus is influenced by a variety of psychosocial as well as physiological factors. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which social support, personal resources, coping styles, metabolic control, and psychosocial adjustment to illness differed among women with diabetes living in different kinds of household structure. A second purpose was to explore the influence of social support, personal resources, coping styles, and household structure on the psychosocial adjustment and metabolic control of women with diabetes. Roy's theory of adaptation provided the theoretical framework for the study. The sample included 115 women whose mean age was 48 years and who had diabetes for an average of 10 years. The instruments consisted of a demographic data form, a measure of social support, a personal resource scale, the Jalowiec Coping Scale, the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, and self-report items for assessing metabolic control and household structure. Multiple analysis of variance showed that women living in different types of household structures differed in both personal resources and coping skills and that women with different levels of metabolic control differed in both personal resources and psychosocial adjustment to illness. Higher levels of social support were significantly correlated with better personal resources, more effective coping skills and better psychosocial adjustment to illness. The use of evasive and emotive coping styles was associated with more problems in psychosocial adjustment to illness. Discriminant analysis indicated that social support, personal resources, household structure, coping skills, and psychosocial adjustmet to illness were poor predictors of metabolic control. Multiple regression showed that 51% of the variance in psychosical adjustment to illness was explained by personal resources, social support, and metabolic control. Findings indicate that household structure, social support, personal resources, and coping skills are important factors in the adjustment of women to the demands of chronic illness. This knowledge will be sueful for nurses in assessing patients and planning interventions. Further research is needed to test nursing interventions designed to enhance social support and coping skills.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe influence of psychosocial factors on women's adjustment to diabetesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilloughby, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Willoughby, PhD, Assistant Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA, email: willoud@clemson.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166228-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful adjustment to a chronic illness such as diabetes mellitus is influenced by a variety of psychosocial as well as physiological factors. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which social support, personal resources, coping styles, metabolic control, and psychosocial adjustment to illness differed among women with diabetes living in different kinds of household structure. A second purpose was to explore the influence of social support, personal resources, coping styles, and household structure on the psychosocial adjustment and metabolic control of women with diabetes. Roy's theory of adaptation provided the theoretical framework for the study. The sample included 115 women whose mean age was 48 years and who had diabetes for an average of 10 years. The instruments consisted of a demographic data form, a measure of social support, a personal resource scale, the Jalowiec Coping Scale, the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, and self-report items for assessing metabolic control and household structure. Multiple analysis of variance showed that women living in different types of household structures differed in both personal resources and coping skills and that women with different levels of metabolic control differed in both personal resources and psychosocial adjustment to illness. Higher levels of social support were significantly correlated with better personal resources, more effective coping skills and better psychosocial adjustment to illness. The use of evasive and emotive coping styles was associated with more problems in psychosocial adjustment to illness. Discriminant analysis indicated that social support, personal resources, household structure, coping skills, and psychosocial adjustmet to illness were poor predictors of metabolic control. Multiple regression showed that 51% of the variance in psychosical adjustment to illness was explained by personal resources, social support, and metabolic control. Findings indicate that household structure, social support, personal resources, and coping skills are important factors in the adjustment of women to the demands of chronic illness. This knowledge will be sueful for nurses in assessing patients and planning interventions. Further research is needed to test nursing interventions designed to enhance social support and coping skills.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:53Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.