2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166230
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Self-Prescribed Therapies Among Women with HIV (DISS)
Author(s):
Sowell, Richard; Demi, Alice
Author Details:
Richard Sowell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina-Columbia College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: richard.sowell@sc.edu; Alice Demi
Abstract:
The lack of a cure and the limited effectiveness of treatments for HIV have contributed to a reported use ofa variety of self-prescribed therapies or alternative treatment approaches by individuals to take control of their health. The potential exists for persons to use self-therapies as a replacement for prescribed medical treatments. Further, the possibility of side-effects if some alternative chemical therapies are used with prescribed drug regimes makes the use of self-prescribed treatment approaches an important issue to clinical practitioners. Presently, there is a paucity of research that examines the use of self-prescribed treatment approaches by women infected with HIV. If women with HIV are to be provided quality health care, it will be necessary to determine the prevalence and the type of self-prescribed therapies being used within this group in order to coordinate these activities with conventional medical care. The purpose of this study is to explore the use of self-prescribed therapies by women diagnosed as having HIV infection. To capture the broadest possible range of self-prescribed therapies, self-therapy was defined as any self initiated practice identified by the women as a means of promoting or maintaining their health. Such therapies could be used either in conjunction with or as a replacement for prescribed medical treatment. Method - This study used a focus group methodology. Twenty-nine women with HIV infection participated in one of 4 focus groups conducted to obtain descriptions of participants' health care behaviors. The focus groups were held in 4 HIV service organizations located in the southeastern U.S. from May to August 1993. Two of the sites were in predominately rural areas, one site was in a metropolitan area and one site in a medium sized city. Women participating in the focus groups represented a wide range of severity of illness from asymptomatic HIV infection to full-blown AIDS. The groups ranged in size from four to ten participants. Content analysis was used to analyze and interpret the data. Individual pieces of information were categorized and coded independently by two members of the research team. Sample Characteristics - Twenty-one of the participants were African-American, five were Caucasian and one participant did not indicate a race. The participants ranged in age from 27 to 63 years, with a mean age of 36.5 years. Five (17%) of the women had completed some college, 13 (45%) had completed high school and 11 (38%) had less than a high school education. Only 3 of the participants were currently married. Twenty of the women had children, with the number of children ranging from 1 to 7 years. Findings - Focus group sessions generated 101 descriptions or comments concerning the use of self-prescribed therapies to promote or maintain health. Participants' comments were analyzed and divided into 9 distinct categories. Presented in descending frequency of mention: Vitamins, Minerals and Herbs; Decisions Not to Use Physician Prescribed Therapies; Spiritual Reliance and Rituals; Exercise; Maintaining a More Positive Attitude; Diet and Nutrition; Self-education; Life Style Changes; and Experimental Drug Therapies. These findings are discussed in relationship to the development of effective treatment strategies for women with HIV/AIDS.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Self-Prescribed Therapies Among Women with HIV (DISS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSowell, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorDemi, Aliceen_US
dc.author.detailsRichard Sowell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina-Columbia College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: richard.sowell@sc.edu; Alice Demien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166230-
dc.description.abstractThe lack of a cure and the limited effectiveness of treatments for HIV have contributed to a reported use ofa variety of self-prescribed therapies or alternative treatment approaches by individuals to take control of their health. The potential exists for persons to use self-therapies as a replacement for prescribed medical treatments. Further, the possibility of side-effects if some alternative chemical therapies are used with prescribed drug regimes makes the use of self-prescribed treatment approaches an important issue to clinical practitioners. Presently, there is a paucity of research that examines the use of self-prescribed treatment approaches by women infected with HIV. If women with HIV are to be provided quality health care, it will be necessary to determine the prevalence and the type of self-prescribed therapies being used within this group in order to coordinate these activities with conventional medical care. The purpose of this study is to explore the use of self-prescribed therapies by women diagnosed as having HIV infection. To capture the broadest possible range of self-prescribed therapies, self-therapy was defined as any self initiated practice identified by the women as a means of promoting or maintaining their health. Such therapies could be used either in conjunction with or as a replacement for prescribed medical treatment. Method - This study used a focus group methodology. Twenty-nine women with HIV infection participated in one of 4 focus groups conducted to obtain descriptions of participants' health care behaviors. The focus groups were held in 4 HIV service organizations located in the southeastern U.S. from May to August 1993. Two of the sites were in predominately rural areas, one site was in a metropolitan area and one site in a medium sized city. Women participating in the focus groups represented a wide range of severity of illness from asymptomatic HIV infection to full-blown AIDS. The groups ranged in size from four to ten participants. Content analysis was used to analyze and interpret the data. Individual pieces of information were categorized and coded independently by two members of the research team. Sample Characteristics - Twenty-one of the participants were African-American, five were Caucasian and one participant did not indicate a race. The participants ranged in age from 27 to 63 years, with a mean age of 36.5 years. Five (17%) of the women had completed some college, 13 (45%) had completed high school and 11 (38%) had less than a high school education. Only 3 of the participants were currently married. Twenty of the women had children, with the number of children ranging from 1 to 7 years. Findings - Focus group sessions generated 101 descriptions or comments concerning the use of self-prescribed therapies to promote or maintain health. Participants' comments were analyzed and divided into 9 distinct categories. Presented in descending frequency of mention: Vitamins, Minerals and Herbs; Decisions Not to Use Physician Prescribed Therapies; Spiritual Reliance and Rituals; Exercise; Maintaining a More Positive Attitude; Diet and Nutrition; Self-education; Life Style Changes; and Experimental Drug Therapies. These findings are discussed in relationship to the development of effective treatment strategies for women with HIV/AIDS.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:56Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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