2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166231
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of hysterectomy on quality of life
Author(s):
Ogburn-Russell, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Ogburn-Russell, PhD, Scott and White Memorial Hospital Texas A&M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas, USA, email: DOGBURNR@swmail.sw.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Hysterectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgeries in America, with approximately 546,000 performed annually. In this era of increasing interest in medical outcomes and cost-containment, outcomes of importance to patients such as symptom relief and effects on quality of life should be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of life, preoperatively and postoperatively, of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions. METHOD: A convenience sample of 250 women undergoing hysterectomies for non-oncologic reasons completed a three part questionnaire preoperatively and at four and eleven months postoperatively. The return rate at 4 months was 82% and at 11 months was 78%. The first instrument assessed current health information; the second and third were the SF-Depression Scale. Supplemental information was abstracted from the subjects' medical records. SAMPLE: The mean age of the women was 40 and 77% of the women were married or living as married. Eighty-one percent of the women were Caucasian, non-Hispanic; 13% were Black and 4% were Hispanic. The most commonly reported gynecological symptom preoperatively was excessive bleeding followed by pelvic pain and fibroids. RESULTS: Overall, women's health status, physically and psychologically, improved post-hysterectomy. All scales of the SF-36 reflected statistically significant (p<.001) improvement in health status postoperatively at both 4 and 11 months. Based on the Zung, the women were found to be less depressed 4 months after surgery compared to before surgery (p<.00001). At 4 months postoperatively, 88% of the women answered "strongly agree" or "agree" when asked if they felt better. By 11 months, this percentage increased to 93%. The women also reported more satisfying relationships postoperatively and less difficulties, pain and discomfort during sexual intercourse. Implications and recommendations for nursing practice are for increased counseling of women considering or awaiting such surgery. Continuing myths regarding hysterectomy, specifically, loss of femininity and their sense of value, can be refuted with these current research findings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of hysterectomy on quality of lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOgburn-Russell, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Ogburn-Russell, PhD, Scott and White Memorial Hospital Texas A&M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas, USA, email: DOGBURNR@swmail.sw.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166231-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Hysterectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgeries in America, with approximately 546,000 performed annually. In this era of increasing interest in medical outcomes and cost-containment, outcomes of importance to patients such as symptom relief and effects on quality of life should be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of life, preoperatively and postoperatively, of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions. METHOD: A convenience sample of 250 women undergoing hysterectomies for non-oncologic reasons completed a three part questionnaire preoperatively and at four and eleven months postoperatively. The return rate at 4 months was 82% and at 11 months was 78%. The first instrument assessed current health information; the second and third were the SF-Depression Scale. Supplemental information was abstracted from the subjects' medical records. SAMPLE: The mean age of the women was 40 and 77% of the women were married or living as married. Eighty-one percent of the women were Caucasian, non-Hispanic; 13% were Black and 4% were Hispanic. The most commonly reported gynecological symptom preoperatively was excessive bleeding followed by pelvic pain and fibroids. RESULTS: Overall, women's health status, physically and psychologically, improved post-hysterectomy. All scales of the SF-36 reflected statistically significant (p<.001) improvement in health status postoperatively at both 4 and 11 months. Based on the Zung, the women were found to be less depressed 4 months after surgery compared to before surgery (p<.00001). At 4 months postoperatively, 88% of the women answered "strongly agree" or "agree" when asked if they felt better. By 11 months, this percentage increased to 93%. The women also reported more satisfying relationships postoperatively and less difficulties, pain and discomfort during sexual intercourse. Implications and recommendations for nursing practice are for increased counseling of women considering or awaiting such surgery. Continuing myths regarding hysterectomy, specifically, loss of femininity and their sense of value, can be refuted with these current research findings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:57Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.