2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166232
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing an Instrument to Measure Affect in Cognitively Impaired (CI) Patients
Author(s):
Beck, Cornelia K.
Author Details:
Cornelia Beck, PhD, Associate Dean Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, email: beckcornelia@exchange.uams.edu
Abstract:
Dementia limits people's options for fulfilling the basic psychosocial needs of communication, self-esteem, and autonomy. When these needs remain unmet, the individual may experience decreased emotional well-being as signaled by increased displays of negative affect and decreased displays of positive affect. Measuring the emotional well-being of CI persons is a new research area, so few instruments are available. To successfully measure affect, researchers must be able to repeatedly observe events. Videotape recordings often re used for this type of research. From a previous study of interventions to decrease disruptive behavior, we have over 700 videotaped interactions between dementia patients and interventionists. These videotapes reveal subjects' change in affect over time, but we were unable to locate a suitable instrument for use with our data. Drawing on the literature and our observations of CI persons, we developed the Observable Displays of Affect Scale (ODAS). We extracted from the literature and available instruments a total of 514 words and phrases related to display of affect. Through a three-step process, we distilled these into a 34 item observational tool that a panel of experts evaluated to establish validity. Two trained observers rated five-minute segments of 26 randomly-selected baseline and final treatment week intervention videotapes to establish inter- and intra-rater reliabilities. The ODAS consists of three subscales: facial display, verbal content, and body movement/posture. We tested two interventions in the Disruptive Behavior Study: a psychosocial activities intervention, an activities of daily living intervention, and a combination of the two. In addition, we had a placebo group and a control group. We are using the ODAS to measure the effect of the project's interventions on displays of affect in our subjects by comparing baseline scores to monthly scores over the 12-week intervention period. In this presentation, I will describe the process by which we developed this instrument, present preliminary analysis of the videotapes, and show samples of our videotapes showing affect changes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping an Instrument to Measure Affect in Cognitively Impaired (CI) Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Cornelia K.en_US
dc.author.detailsCornelia Beck, PhD, Associate Dean Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, email: beckcornelia@exchange.uams.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166232-
dc.description.abstractDementia limits people's options for fulfilling the basic psychosocial needs of communication, self-esteem, and autonomy. When these needs remain unmet, the individual may experience decreased emotional well-being as signaled by increased displays of negative affect and decreased displays of positive affect. Measuring the emotional well-being of CI persons is a new research area, so few instruments are available. To successfully measure affect, researchers must be able to repeatedly observe events. Videotape recordings often re used for this type of research. From a previous study of interventions to decrease disruptive behavior, we have over 700 videotaped interactions between dementia patients and interventionists. These videotapes reveal subjects' change in affect over time, but we were unable to locate a suitable instrument for use with our data. Drawing on the literature and our observations of CI persons, we developed the Observable Displays of Affect Scale (ODAS). We extracted from the literature and available instruments a total of 514 words and phrases related to display of affect. Through a three-step process, we distilled these into a 34 item observational tool that a panel of experts evaluated to establish validity. Two trained observers rated five-minute segments of 26 randomly-selected baseline and final treatment week intervention videotapes to establish inter- and intra-rater reliabilities. The ODAS consists of three subscales: facial display, verbal content, and body movement/posture. We tested two interventions in the Disruptive Behavior Study: a psychosocial activities intervention, an activities of daily living intervention, and a combination of the two. In addition, we had a placebo group and a control group. We are using the ODAS to measure the effect of the project's interventions on displays of affect in our subjects by comparing baseline scores to monthly scores over the 12-week intervention period. In this presentation, I will describe the process by which we developed this instrument, present preliminary analysis of the videotapes, and show samples of our videotapes showing affect changes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:58Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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