Theory-Based Intervention and Affiliated-Individuation in Caregivers of Adultswith Demenita

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166233
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Theory-Based Intervention and Affiliated-Individuation in Caregivers of Adultswith Demenita
Author(s):
Acton, Gayle
Author Details:
Gayle Acton, PhD, Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gayle.acton@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: As a part of a larger study, the purpose of this study was to test the effect of a theory-based intervention (nurse-led support groups) on levels of affiliated-individuation in caregivers of adults with dementia. Affiliated-individuation, a theoretical concept from the nursing theory Modeling and Role-Modeling, is defined as the inherent need to be affiliated with other people and systems (support) while simultaneously remaining independent from these same people and systems (control) and maintaining a comfort and confidence in both situations. The support group intervention was aimed at increasing the caregivers' affiliation with other people and systems while simultaneously facilitating the development of resources so the caregivers might be able to experience a sense of control over his or her caregiving situation. SAMPLE: The sample consisted of 26 caregivers of adults with dementia. METHODS: Caregivers attended bi-weekly support groups led by nurses. Data were collected pre-intervention (Baseline) and at 6 (Time 1) and 12 (Time 2) months post baseline. Safety/security and love/belonging subscales of the Basic Needs Satisfaction Index (BNSI) were used to measure affiliation. The subscales of esteem/self-esteem and self-actualization of the BNSI were used to measure individuation. Data were analyzed via MANOVA to assess within subjects variance across time. FINDINGS: Mean scores for affiliation: Baseline=30.48; Time 1=31.14; Time 2= 31.79. Mean scores for individuation: Baseline=30.68; Time 1=33.38; Time 2= 32.24. No significant differences in within subjects variances were found. SECONDARY FINDINGS: Twelve of the caregivers were interviewed at Time 2 and asked, "Overall, what has it been like for you to participate in the support groups?". Caregivers said the support groups helped them develop connecting relationships with others and described the concepts of acceptance, trust, sharing, and safety. Caregivers also stated that the ability to connect with themselves was facilitated describing internal strengths, accomplishments, decision-making skills, self-worth, and accepting self as essential concepts. These data suggest a process that parallels the theoretical and operational definition of affiliated-individuation indicating that it may have played an important role in their ability to contend with the stress of caregiving. Therefore, it is logical to suspect that affiliated-individuation was not fully captured via the quantitative measures. The secondary findings will be presented to demonstrate the value of collecting and comparing both quantitative and qualitative data.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTheory-Based Intervention and Affiliated-Individuation in Caregivers of Adultswith Demenitaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorActon, Gayleen_US
dc.author.detailsGayle Acton, PhD, Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gayle.acton@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166233-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: As a part of a larger study, the purpose of this study was to test the effect of a theory-based intervention (nurse-led support groups) on levels of affiliated-individuation in caregivers of adults with dementia. Affiliated-individuation, a theoretical concept from the nursing theory Modeling and Role-Modeling, is defined as the inherent need to be affiliated with other people and systems (support) while simultaneously remaining independent from these same people and systems (control) and maintaining a comfort and confidence in both situations. The support group intervention was aimed at increasing the caregivers' affiliation with other people and systems while simultaneously facilitating the development of resources so the caregivers might be able to experience a sense of control over his or her caregiving situation. SAMPLE: The sample consisted of 26 caregivers of adults with dementia. METHODS: Caregivers attended bi-weekly support groups led by nurses. Data were collected pre-intervention (Baseline) and at 6 (Time 1) and 12 (Time 2) months post baseline. Safety/security and love/belonging subscales of the Basic Needs Satisfaction Index (BNSI) were used to measure affiliation. The subscales of esteem/self-esteem and self-actualization of the BNSI were used to measure individuation. Data were analyzed via MANOVA to assess within subjects variance across time. FINDINGS: Mean scores for affiliation: Baseline=30.48; Time 1=31.14; Time 2= 31.79. Mean scores for individuation: Baseline=30.68; Time 1=33.38; Time 2= 32.24. No significant differences in within subjects variances were found. SECONDARY FINDINGS: Twelve of the caregivers were interviewed at Time 2 and asked, "Overall, what has it been like for you to participate in the support groups?". Caregivers said the support groups helped them develop connecting relationships with others and described the concepts of acceptance, trust, sharing, and safety. Caregivers also stated that the ability to connect with themselves was facilitated describing internal strengths, accomplishments, decision-making skills, self-worth, and accepting self as essential concepts. These data suggest a process that parallels the theoretical and operational definition of affiliated-individuation indicating that it may have played an important role in their ability to contend with the stress of caregiving. Therefore, it is logical to suspect that affiliated-individuation was not fully captured via the quantitative measures. The secondary findings will be presented to demonstrate the value of collecting and comparing both quantitative and qualitative data.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:42:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:42:59Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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