2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166235
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neonatal Intensive Care: Parents' Perceptions and Perspectives
Author(s):
Raines, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Raines, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: draines@buffalo.edu
Abstract:
Understanding the values and perceptions of parents of Low-birthweight infants receiving Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC) can help health care professionals to appreciate the needs of facilities and to provide holistic care. The specific foci of this research were on developing a understanding of: involvement and decision making, perceptions of the NIC process and outcome, and desirable care-giver attributes, from the perspective of the parent. The theoretical framework guiding this research was Rokeach' s (1973) Nature of Human Values and Values Systems. This theory is grounded in the perspective that values are motivators of behavior and choices. The significance an individual places on a value determines its importance and serves as a criterion to rationalize the rightness or wrongness of a choice, action or behavior. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, data were generated from parent's (n= 17) of infants admitted to the neonatal unit with a primary presenting problem of low-birthweight. This study was limited to parents of infants who had been receiving NIC for a minimum of three days, and had no evidence of genetic/chromosomal disorders or congenital anomalies requiring surgical intervention for correction or palliation at the time of birth. Data were collected until emerging categories were elaborated and saturation was achieved. The form of data collection was audiotaped interviews that were subsequently transcribed into written transcripts for analysis. Interviews were conducted using a structured interview guide to assure that all areas of interest were explored. Data analysis consisted of decontextualization ad recontextualization to identify events, occurrences, or behaviors and to establish similarities, relationships, and connections, resulting in the emergence of themes. Four major themes emerged from the data: Being Involved, Technology for Survival, A Human Factor, and Caring-Giver Attributes. The theme being involved encompassed knowing about the infant's medical status and treatment plan, and participating in the infants care during hospitalization. Participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge of the medical needs of the infant, and expressed a trust in health care providers, yet wanted to develop understanding of the infant's needs. A change in perception of NIC, experienced by the participants is evident in the themes related to technology and human factors. Initially parents' impressions and expectations of NIC were focused on the equipment and the belief that technology would fix everything. However, over time, parents recognized the essential participation of the staff and the powerful nature of the human factor in the management of the technology. This human technology interaction was evident in the attributes identified as desirable in care givers: competence and caring were given the highest priority with communication skill and patience on a secondary level.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeonatal Intensive Care: Parents' Perceptions and Perspectivesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRaines, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Raines, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: draines@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166235-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the values and perceptions of parents of Low-birthweight infants receiving Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC) can help health care professionals to appreciate the needs of facilities and to provide holistic care. The specific foci of this research were on developing a understanding of: involvement and decision making, perceptions of the NIC process and outcome, and desirable care-giver attributes, from the perspective of the parent. The theoretical framework guiding this research was Rokeach' s (1973) Nature of Human Values and Values Systems. This theory is grounded in the perspective that values are motivators of behavior and choices. The significance an individual places on a value determines its importance and serves as a criterion to rationalize the rightness or wrongness of a choice, action or behavior. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, data were generated from parent's (n= 17) of infants admitted to the neonatal unit with a primary presenting problem of low-birthweight. This study was limited to parents of infants who had been receiving NIC for a minimum of three days, and had no evidence of genetic/chromosomal disorders or congenital anomalies requiring surgical intervention for correction or palliation at the time of birth. Data were collected until emerging categories were elaborated and saturation was achieved. The form of data collection was audiotaped interviews that were subsequently transcribed into written transcripts for analysis. Interviews were conducted using a structured interview guide to assure that all areas of interest were explored. Data analysis consisted of decontextualization ad recontextualization to identify events, occurrences, or behaviors and to establish similarities, relationships, and connections, resulting in the emergence of themes. Four major themes emerged from the data: Being Involved, Technology for Survival, A Human Factor, and Caring-Giver Attributes. The theme being involved encompassed knowing about the infant's medical status and treatment plan, and participating in the infants care during hospitalization. Participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge of the medical needs of the infant, and expressed a trust in health care providers, yet wanted to develop understanding of the infant's needs. A change in perception of NIC, experienced by the participants is evident in the themes related to technology and human factors. Initially parents' impressions and expectations of NIC were focused on the equipment and the belief that technology would fix everything. However, over time, parents recognized the essential participation of the staff and the powerful nature of the human factor in the management of the technology. This human technology interaction was evident in the attributes identified as desirable in care givers: competence and caring were given the highest priority with communication skill and patience on a secondary level.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:02Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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